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Ecclesiastical Marriage Banns

Religious Records are often among the first records we search for in our research projects. Many of the courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies cover various aspects of these vital records and give us a glimpse into the lives of our ancestors. (See this blog post about our Religious Records courses.)

This week we continue our investigation of Marriage Banns in Module 2 of the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course by examining the Ecclesiastical Marriage Banns for Sardo & Fontana.

Ecclesiastical Marriage Banns – Melchiore Sardo & Giacoma Fontana
Chiesa di San Nicolo, Trapani, Trapani province, Italy; “Matrimoni [marriage records, which included marriage banns], 1778”: no record number, 17 September 1778, ecclesiastical marriage banns for Melchiore Sardo and Giacoma Fontana; digitized images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ : accessed 4 Sep 2019).

Translation – Ecclesiastical Marriage Banns – Melchiore Sardo & Giacoma Fontana
Chiesa di San Nicolo, Trapani, Trapani province, Italy; “Matrimoni [marriage records, which included marriage banns], 1778”: no record number, 17 September 1778, ecclesiastical marriage banns for Melchiore Sardo and Giacoma Fontana; digitized images, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ : accessed 4 Sep 2019).

We can see that the 17th of September was the date of the request for marriage banns. The first bann was posted three days later, the second bann seven days after that, and the third bann only two days after the second bann. Thus fulfilling the requirement of three declarations.

Both the bride and groom were living in the town of Trapani when their banns were posted. However, the bride was born in the town of Monte San Giuliano, another town in the Trapani province. This gives clues for where to search for further records on these families.

You will also note that the surnames of both mothers were omitted. Locating and identifying our female ancestors is always a challenge. Thankfully, later records required more information to be recorded than earlier records.

You can explore more information about these records in the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course, where we examine in detail the various forms of Italian marriages records that were created, and what genealogical information you may find in them.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
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LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Italian Marriage Banns

Religious Records are covered by several courses at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. (See this blog post about our Religious Records courses.) One specific type of records to explore are Marriage Banns. You may think they were only used in the past, but they are still in use in today, although not as common. As we continue to look at the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course, we find that Marriage Banns are covered in Module 2.

Marriage Banns were an attempt to curb clandestine or forced marriages. Canonical law stated the marriage banns, announcing an upcoming marriage, must be read from the pulpit on three consecutive holy days (Sunday mass or feast days) and, also posted on the door of the parish.

If the bride and groom were not from the same parish, banns would be posted and announced in both parishes. It was the priest’s responsibility to determine a couple’s residence in a certain place or quasi-residence (residing there part of the year, more than six months) so that the priest knew where the banns should be posted and read. He was required to keep a written record of the banns, as well as any requests for publication that he makes to other parishes.

The banns allowed parish members to bring forth any objections or impediments, either of affinity or consanguinity. A priest could not refuse the posting of the banns unless there was a reason, as defined by canon law. If no objections were found, the couple would then be married in front of their parents with a large celebration to follow.

Parents with limited financing and several children of marriageable age would often marry off two children at once, saving themselves the cost of a second marriage celebration. Always look at the record before and after to see if it might be for a sibling of the ancestor you are researching. Depending on the time period and region, there may or may not have been a subsequent civil marriage required.

You can explore more information about these records in the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course, where we examine in detail the various forms of Italian marriages records that were created, and what genealogical information you may find in them.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
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LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Marriage in the Roman Catholic Church

Religious Records cover a wide variety of documents. The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers several courses covering this topic. (See this blog post about our Religious Records courses.) It is important to become familiar with the religious records relevant to the region and specific time period where you are researching. Records for the same denomination could be different depending on location and the local laws and regulations, even within the same country.

As we continue to look at the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course, we find that Marriage in the Roman Catholic Church is covered in Module 2. Here is a portion of what will be discussed.

A 1564 decree made marriage in the Roman Catholic Church a sacrament. This was reinforced by Papal proclamation in 1595. The requirements for marriage, as dictated by the Council of Trent, were:

  • Marriage was a sacrament and Church business
  • Couples had to have parental consent, appear with parents/guardians
  • Couples could not be forced into marriage, must have free choice
  • Marriage must be performed in front of two witness

Additionally, within parish marriage records, you will sometimes find registers for the Stato Libero (statement of free status) or Sponsati Contratti (marriage engagements/contracts). These records were for marriage engagements/contracts to be performed elsewhere, and for stating that the bride or groom was free to marry. The following is an example of this type of document.

Statement of Free Status – Francesco d’Averzo & nine-year-old Michela Pizzolato, Catania, Italy

Note: Italy has laws concerning privacy restrictions like any other country. Italian privacy law extends for 70 years after the creation of a birth record, and 50 years from the date of the event on a death or marriage record. A priest will usually follow the privacy laws when determining whether you can access the records.

You can explore more information about these records in the Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 course, where we examine in detail the various forms of Italian marriages records that were created, and what genealogical information you may find in them.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Italian State of the Souls Records

Every country-specific certificate program at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies includes courses for Religious Records.

Continuing to research our ancestors and their family members through religious records, we will often discover unique types of records created within the church records for that region or country. Becoming familiar with these records will make it easier to understand the information we discover within them.

The course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2, begins with the State of the Souls Records and what they cover in Parish records. Let’s explore these Italian church records.

State of the Souls Records in Genealogy

State of the Souls records can be tremendously helpful in extending a family’s ancestry in those areas of Italy that did not keep civil registration between the years 1816-1865, and in the centuries prior to civil registration. What information they recorded varied depending on the time period, education level or age of the priest, and the location in which it was recorded.

The records may be written in the Latin, Italian, and French languages, or in combination with regional dialects. However, they were predominantly written in Italian and Latin. Some records contained two or more languages/dialects within the same register or even on the same record. One such set of parish records had French, Latin, and Italian all mixed together in nearly every record. This made for a confusing translation process.

The status animarum were created during annual pastoral visits to each household. In large cities or when the priest was elderly, one entry may have been made that he then updated each Easter over a series of years. Occupations, titles, and tax notations can provide evidence of an ancestor’s social status within the community.

The status animarum were progressive records, meaning that they were not created at one time, but rather, over a series of years. Additionally, multiple priests could have made entries to a single status animarum record. This can create multiple chances for transcription error. Age, attention to detail, the size of the parish, and a variety of other factors can play a part in the accuracy of the information in these records. Despite this, these documents are thought to hold strong evidence on an Italian family.

We will show examples of these valuable records in a future blog post. See the blog post here.

Are you researching your Italian Catholic ancestors? Learn more about researching your Italian ancestors in the course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 2 through their records. Check the Course Calendar for the next time this course will be offered.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Diocese and Archdiocese in Italian Records

Every country-specific certificate program at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies includes courses for Religious Records.

As we research our ancestors and their family members, we will undoubtedly be faced with the challenge of locating their religious records within the communities where they spent their lives. In small rural areas, it may be easy as we locate the only village parish. However, it is not always as simple as we may think.

As we continue in the course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1, our next task will be to Understand Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions & Archives and how to access the Parish records in local archives. Let’s dig a little deeper.

Diocese & Archdiocese

Diocese, spelled the same in Italian and English, is a group of parishes within a particular ecclesiastical district. Each diocese has a diocesan archive, usually named Archivio Diocesano or Archivio Storico Diocesano.

An archdiocese is a group of dioceses within a particular region (regione ecclesiastica). Some larger cities may contain the seat of the archdiocese as well as one of the dioceses within their jurisdiction. In these cases, the main offices are usually combined and the Archivio Diocesano located in the same building. These archives are usually quite organized, but their hours of operation are few. Often there is only one archivist who is also a priest with all the duties that come with that position.

Many diocesan archives will have their own websites containing contact information, hours, and descriptions about their collection. Research in the diocese archive is usually by appointment only so please be sure to write ahead for permission several weeks in advance before leaving for Italy on a research trip. Additionally, you should verify that they have the type of records you seek. An archive’s contents, what records have survived, and the procedure to access the records can vary widely. It is advisable to leave at least 50 euros as a donation after being allowed to access these records.

Some diocesan archives have the parish records for all the parishes within their jurisdiction prior to 1900. Other dioceses have records conserved in each individual parish.

The types of records usually found in a diocesan archive may include:

  • Marriage supplements (which may contain a dispensation)
  • Baptismal and Marriage records after 1900 (second copy)
  • Records of Closed Parishes
  • Service Records for Priests and Nuns
  • The State of the Souls Records (stato delle anime)

These records will be invaluable to your Italian research.

Are you researching your Italian Catholic ancestors? Our course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1 can help you to discover part of their stories through the records they left behind. Check the Course Calendar for the next time this course will be offered.

—————————————————-
Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Understanding Latin in Italian Records

Every country-specific certificate program at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies includes courses for Religious Records. In many cases, the religious beliefs of our ancestors became a vital part of their family story. We explore the records of baptisms, marriages and burials, along with other religious ceremonies relating to their beliefs and customs, to discover information not found in the civil records.

In the course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1, we will examine these records, but one of the first challenges may be language. A useful resource is the Italian Genealogical Word List for translating Italian to English. However, Latin may be a bigger challenge. Here are some tips.

A Lesson in Latin: Understanding the Italian Records

Latin is an inflected language in which all verbs are conjugated, and all the nouns and adjectives use different cases. This means that words have different endings according to the function they play in a sentence, so it really does not matter in what order the words in a sentence are presented. This is different than the English language.

Names and words can be seen in the normative, genitive, ablative, and accusative forms. These are defined as:

  • “Nominative (nominativus): Subject of the sentence.
  • Genitive (genitivus): Generally translated by the English possessive, or by the objective with the preposition of.
  • Accusative (accusativus): Direct object of the verb and object with many prepositions.
  • Ablative (ablativus): Used to show means, manner, place, and other circumstances. Usually translated by the objective with the prepositions “from, by, with, in, at.””[1]

Some examples include:

Nominative Genitive (of) ex + Ablative (from) Accusative Italian
Antoni-us Antoni-i ex Antoni-o Antoni-um Antonio
Joseph-us Joseph-i ex Joseph-o Joseph-um Giuseppe
Anna-a Ann-ae ex Ann-a Ann-am Anna
Joann-es Joann-is ex Joan-e Joann-em Giovanni

Recurrent words have different endings:

Nominative Genitive Accusative English
Fili-us Fili-i Fili-um Son
Fili-a Fili-ae Fili-am Daughter
Infans Infant-is Infant-em Infant

Months are often abbreviated:

English Latin Abbreviation(s)
September septembris 7ber, 7bris, VIIber, VIIbris
October octobris 8ber, 8bris, VIIIber, VIIIbris
November Novembris 9ber, 9bris, IXber, IXbris
December Decembris 10ber, 10bris, Xber, Xbris

Are you researching your Italian Catholic ancestors? Our course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1 can help you to discover part of their stories through the records they left behind. Check the Course Calendar for the next time this course will be offered.

[1] “The 6 Cases of Latin Nouns,” ThoughtCo. (https://www.thoughtco.com/cases-of-latin-nouns-117588 : accessed 16 September 2019).

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

 

New Course: Italian Civil Registration Records Part 2

Researching your Italian roots? Check out our newest course: Italian: Civil Registration Records-Part 2. This course follows Italian: Civil Registration Records – Part 1.

"Italy Flag Means Italian Nationality And European" by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Italy Flag Means Italian Nationality And European by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Civil registration is one of the largest and most important record sets in Italian genealogical research. It is certainly the most accessible, due to the efforts of FamilySearch (and now the main Italian archive) to microfilm and digitize these records. However, civil registration is more than just birth, death, and marriage records. In this course, we will delve into some of the more unusual civil records. We’ll not only learn what they are but also how to use these records. These records can be used to “flesh out” the history of your ancestors, providing unique details that may help you understand the ancestors in their social and political context.

We’ll also delve more deeply into the Italian resources available through FamilySearch, Ancestry.com, and Portale Antenati, the Italian government’s website. Collections available at Italian Archivi di Stato will be explored. Students will learn what types of documents these archives contain and how best to access them.

Written by Melanie Holtz, CG, Italian: Civil Registration Records-Part 2 will help you find and document your Italian ancestors. To learn more about this course see our website.

Italian Ancestors? Check Out These New Courses

Italian Flag Shows Italy Nationality And Nation by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Italian Flag Shows Italy Nationality And Nation by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Have Italian ancestors? Lucky you! The National Institute has two new courses to help you.

Italian: Language and Location

Understanding, or being able to decipher, the languages found with Italian genealogical documents is an essential skill needed to effectively research your Italian ancestors. While most records are in Italian, you will find other languages within the records depending on the history of the town or region you are researching. Emphasis is placed on reading the handwriting and how to translate and understand basic Italian records.

Locating places within Italy can be confusing until you understand the political and ecclesiastical jurisdictions. We review these jurisdictions and look at a variety of ways that will help you narrow your search for your ancestor’s town of origin. If you already know the town of origin, this section may help as your research expands as the research often leads into nearby towns, due to the practice of marrying outside a town’s populace.

To learn more about this course see our website.

 

Italian: Civil Registration-Part 1

Civil registration is one of the largest and most important record sets in Italian genealogical research. It is certainly the most accessible, due to the efforts of FamilySearch, and now the main Italian archive, in microfilming or digitizing these records.

In this course, we delve deeper into three main types of records: birth records [both regular and supplemental], marriage records [including marriage banns and marriage supplements], and death records [both regular and supplemental]. Each type of record has different challenges as well as differences in format depending on the time period and/or location of its creation within Italy.

We also delve more deeply into translating and abstracting these documents so that you can understand more fully how to find every piece of genealogically useful information they contain. You will learn how to spot discrepancies and information contained that is over and above what is generally given. Understanding the documents is the heart of the course and there will be much study required of the example documents.

You should have completed the Italian: Introduction to Research Outside of Italy and Italian: Language and Location courses, or have a good understanding of the content of those courses, before commencing this course.

To learn more about this course see our website.

New Course: Italian: Civil Registration-Part 1

Basilica Of Santa Croce  by James Barker Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Basilica Of Santa Croce by James Barker Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Have Italian roots? Then you’ll want to check out our newest course, Italian: Civil Registration-Part 1.

Written by professional genealogist and Italian research expert Melanie D. Holtz, CG this course looks at civil registration, one of the largest and most important record sets in Italian genealogical research.

In this course, you will delve deeper into three main types of records: birth records [both regular and supplemental], marriage records [including marriage banns and marriage supplements], and death records [both regular and supplemental]. Each type of record has different challenges as well as differences in format depending on the time period and/or location of its creation within Italy.

You will also delve more deeply into translating and abstracting these documents so that you can understand more fully how to find every piece of genealogically useful information they contain. You will learn how to spot discrepancies and information contained that is over and above what is generally given. Understanding the documents is the heart of the course and there will be much study required of the example documents.

For those interested in registering for this course, you should have previously completed the courses, Italian: Introduction to Research Outside of Italy and Italian: Language and Location, or have a good understanding of the content of those courses, before commencing this course.

Italian: Civil Registration-Part 1 begins in March. Register for it today!

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