The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

New Course: Business Skills: Marketing Your Services

Open Sign Shows Grand Opening And Advertisement by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Open Sign Shows Grand Opening And Advertisement by Stuart Miles/Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Ask anyone who has tried their hand at running a small business. If you start it, they (clients) won’t necessarily come.

Marketing is the way to get the word out about your business, so that potential clients or customers will find you. As with most professionals, you may prefer to spend your time and energy doing what you do best—whether that is writing books of families’ histories, making video-biographies, or capturing oral histories for a business history—but in order to find clients, you must give adequate attention to marketing.

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies is proud to announce a new course by Personal Historian Diane DassowBusiness Skills: Marketing Your Services is the latest course offering in the Professional Development Certificate to help you start and be successful in a genealogy business.

In this course, we will present the basic methods and topics in marketing, geared toward a small business owner like a personal historian or professional genealogist.

You can read more about the course on our website. The first offering of this 8-week course is April 2015. It is recommended that you have taken the course, Business Skills: Creating a Genealogy Business, or at least have written a business plan and started a business.

Student Presentation: Seema Kenney

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies course, Lecturing Skills Including Preparation, teaches the skills needed to present genealogical-related lectures. It is a “hands on” course where the student presents a lecture via our Virtual Learning Room. We invite you to participate and hear your fellow student. This is a 30-minute lectures, followed by a 10-minute Question & Answer period and a short poll to provide the student with feedback on their skills. Please come and support your fellow students!

This is an excellent learning experience for all involved–the student presenter and the audience! We all can learn new and interesting tidbits, even from topics that are not in our area of research.

Seema Kenney. Used with permission.

Seema Kenney. Used with permission.

Join us on Sunday, March 22nd at 2:00 PM EDT when Seema Kenney  presents Researching at an Historical Society.

Researching at an Historical Society
Genealogical Research away from the computer. Looking at the real items of an Historical Society and the story they can help create about your ancestors’ lives.

Presenter Bio: Seema Kenney has 15 years experience as a software instructor and 4 years as a professional genealogist. Her known roots are deep in New England as well as England, Germany, and Sweden.

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/lecturing/
(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

Remember, to join a Virtual Meeting … anyone can participate. Hope to see you there!

To enter the Virtual Learning Room for a session you would like to attend, please click on the Location link or enter the Location URL into your browser. (No user name or password required; “Enter as a Guest”)

NOTE: Please sign in with your first AND last names when joining a Virtual Meeting. This will help everyone differentiate between individuals with the same name. (No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

 

 

Student Presentation: Erica Dakin Voolich

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies course, Lecturing Skills Including Preparation, teaches the skills needed to present genealogical-related lectures. It is a “hands on” course where the student presents a lecture via our Virtual Learning Room. We invite you to participate and hear your fellow student. This is a 30-minute lectures, followed by a 10-minute Question & Answer period and a short poll to provide the student with feedback on their skills. Please come and support your fellow students!

This is an excellent learning experience for all involved–the student presenter and the audience! We all can learn new and interesting tidbits, even from topics that are not in our area of research.

Erica Dakin Voolich. Used with permission.
Join us on Tuesday, March 3rd at 2:00 PM EST when Erica Dakin Voolich presents Taken with a Large Grain of Salt – Verifying Family Stories.

Presenter: Erica Dakin Voolich is an author, blogger and teacher who has transitioned from using her problem solving skills in the mathematics classroom to solving family history problems. Erica authors the blogs,  Will the real Ursula Wright please stand up! and Erica’s Adventures in Genealogy.
Presentation Description: We collect family stories, but we can’t assume veracity. Traditional sources don’t always confirm the legend. Doing a case study, we look at other sources to verify the family information.

Time zones: Tuesday, March 3rd – 2:00 PM Eastern; 1:00 PM Central; 11:00 AM Pacific;7:00 PM in London, England; Wednesday, March 4th – 6:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/lecturing/
(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

Remember, to join a Virtual Meeting … anyone can participate. Hope to see you there!

To enter the Virtual Learning Room for a session you would like to attend, please click on the Location link or enter the Location URL into your browser. (No user name or password required; “Enter as a Guest”)

NOTE: Please sign in with your first AND last names when joining a Virtual Meeting. This will help everyone differentiate between individuals with the same name. (No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

 

 

More New Courses for 2015 Starting NOW!

There’s nothing like looking forward to a new month of genealogy courses and this month we have quite a few new ones you’ll want to register for. New courses begin today, Monday, February 2, 2015. But there’s still time to register.

Image courtesy of  stockimages/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of stockimages/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Writing the Genealogist’s Memoir 

As a genealogy researcher for your family, you can enhance the results of your work, as well as realize personal satisfaction and value, by creating a memoir to enlighten those who read it. Your memoir can tell them about the story behind your research: your inspiration, motivation and/or interest in genealogy; your process; “aha” moments; roadblocks and disappointments; and successes. The professional genealogist or personal historian can also offer a service to help clients create such a companion piece for their family trees or histories.

This course written by Personal Historian Diane Dassow will explore the importance and value of memoir, a method for accomplishing one, and special issues to consider. Exercises will offer practical application of the material and opportunities to work on writing your memoir. The course will focus on writing as a method but will explore other options, such as audio and video, as well.

To learn more about this course, check out our website.

 

Dna by dream designs Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Dna by dream designs Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

DNA: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy

This course written by Diahan Southard is a comprehensive introduction to genetic genealogy. The basics of DNA and genetic inheritance are explained in detail. The three main test types, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y chromosome DNA (YDNA), and autosomal DNA (atDNA) are explored as they relate to genealogy. This includes an overview of laboratory procedures for each kind of test, data interpretation techniques, database searching, match interpretation, and case studies for the three kinds of DNA testing. This course will include comparisons of tools and companies, as well as the genetic stories of famous people.

To  register for this course, click here.

 

Pile Of Books by Surachai/courtesy of  freedigitalphotos.net

Pile Of Books by Surachai/courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Skill-Building: Evidence Analysis 

Taking the time to study a wide variety of case studies and proof arguments/summaries can expand your knowledge of methodology, evidence and analysis, sources, citation formats, cultural mores, immigration patterns, as well as  many other things. It will make you a better genealogist by expanding your knowledge beyond the subset of genealogy that you normally work in.

As an example, someone working in Canadian research on a daily basis can learn much from a case study on Irish research and vice versa. Amongst other things, they can learn methodology, new sources of evidence, how to analyze evidence, and even gain geographical and cultural knowledge!

Read more about this course here.

And that’s not all. In case you didn’t hear we have other new courses that started this year including:

Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting

Research: FamilySearch Resources

Italian: Language and Location

Australian: Newspapers and Biographies

 

So really the only question is, which course will you take first?

 

Attending the 2015 APG PMC

webBan_PMC-RegistrationPage_650x250

 

By Lynn Funk, Student

On January 8th and 9th, 2015, I was privileged to attend the Association of Professional Genealogists’ Professional Management Conference thanks to the free registration I won from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. It was a wonderful conference from start to finish. To be in a room with so many people who share my passion for family history was exhilarating to say the least!

Ron Arons 2015 APG PMC  instructor. Photo by Phyllis Codling McLaughlin. Used with  permission.

Ron Arons 2015 APG PMC instructor. Photo by Phyllis Codling McLaughlin. Used with permission.

I attended many informative classes including two sessions on source citation given by Dr. Thomas Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGS, FNGS—I feel much more confident in citing sources now! I also learned about mind mapping (Ron Arons), Affiliate Marketing and Self Publishing (Thomas MacEntee), and DNA and Genealogical Proof (Angie Bush, MS). Kimberly Powell, current president of APG, spoke to us about using Scrivener to organize our research and James Beidler addressed us on “Finding Your Niche: Matching Passion, Professionalism & Pecuniary Interest.”  The always knowledgeable and entertaining Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, spoke about the importance of knowing what the law was “at the time and in the place” where our ancestors lived, and Billie Fogarty, M.Ed., talked about the ins and outs (and ups and downs) of being a genealogical speaker.

Howard Hochhauser, CFO Ancestry.com. Photo  by Phyllis Codling McLaughlin. Used with permission.

Howard Hochhauser, CFO Ancestry.com. Photo by Phyllis Codling McLaughlin. Used with permission.

The opening keynote address was giving by Howard Hochhauser, the CFO of Ancestry.com (Tim Sullivan, President & CEO of Ancestry.com was scheduled to present but was unable to make it at the last minute). His address was on “Don’t We All Need Some Professional Help?” and was very informative. It was interesting to hear how Ancestry.com works—how their search engine functions and what audience they cater to. It made the results we sometimes get (that make us shake our heads) a little more understandable. They also talked about Ancestry.com’s purchase of ProGenealogists and what this company has to offer in the way of research help and employment for those interested.

On Thursday, I attended a luncheon where David Rencher, AG,CG, FIGRS, FUGA, Chief Genealogical Officer at FamilySearch spoke. He addressed the concerns that many of us have about the  FamilySearch FamilyTree (it’s a free-for-all, anyone can change your information, etc.) and said they really want professional genealogists to take the lead in creating accurate, fully sourced family trees on this site.

I thoroughly enjoyed attending this conference. One of the best parts of attending was the connections I made that may help me in researching my own family and also in starting my own genealogy business. The men and women who attended this conference were very forthcoming and eager to provide guidance and tips they have learned over the years as they have grown their own businesses in the family history sector.

The icing on the cake for me was winning a door prize: a one year research membership in the New England Historic Genealogical Society. I have heard they have wonderful databases and am anxious to try them out! All in all, it was a great experience and one I would recommend to anyone who is seriously considering genealogy as a profession.

New Course: Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting Research

Computer Keyboard by Ambro courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Computer Keyboard by Ambro courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting Research written by Forensic Genealogist Leslie Brinkley Lawson is a new course offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies starting January 12, 2015.

A professional or serious minded genealogist needs to perfect core skills to help them achieve success whether they conduct research for clients, lecture, or write. These skills include source citation, transcription and writing. In the field of genealogy there are some texts that are considered the standard by which professionals are judged―these include Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace by Elizabeth Shown Mills, Dr. Thomas Jones’ Mastering Genealogical Proof and the Board for Certification of Genealogists’ Genealogy Standards. These books help prepare the professional or serious minded genealogist for the day to day work of writing, analyzing and preparing information for themselves or the clients that they come in contact with. Books like Professional Genealogy “offers benchmarks by which they can advance their skills and place their businesses on sounder footing.”

In this course students  will study portions of some of the above mentioned texts and complete assignments and exercises to better understand the key elements taught within its pages.

Not a course for beginning researchers, please be aware this course is classified as “Intermediate Level” in the Professional Development Certificate Program. It has been developed for individuals who are at or working in the Intermediate to Advanced Levels in our other certificate programs. If you are considering taking this course, you should have completed or have full knowledge/experience from our courses: Skills: Transcribing, Abstracting & Extracting, Methodology – Part 3: More Strategies, and Methodology – Part 4: Effective Searching and Recording.

This course requires compulsory materials.

Take your research to the next level and register for Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting Research today!

Two New Courses Begin Monday!

Courtesy of  jannoon028/freedigitalphotos.net

Courtesy of jannoon028/freedigitalphotos.net

 

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies is pleased to announce the addition of two new courses to our Professional Development Certificate.  Writing for Genealogy: Articles, Blogs, Research Report and so much more and Personal Historian: Telling the Story, written by genealogist and author Jennifer Holik premieres on March 3, 2014. To register for these or one of our over 200 genealogical courses, see our website at www.genealogicalstudies.com.

Writing for Genealogy: Articles, Blogs, Research Report and so much more

Writing is an essential part of the work of a professional genealogist. Whether you choose to lecture, research for clients, or write content for others, it is important to not only know how to write but to understand how to incorporate various kinds of writing into your business. This course looks at the different types of writing you may do as a working genealogist and gives tips for resources to help further your knowledge of writing. In this course we will examine continuing education, writing client reports, business writing, writing for societies and for editors.

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Improving Your Skills Through Writing Groups and Writing Practice
  • Writing for the Online World
  • Marketing
  • Genealogy Business Writing
  • Writing for Organizations
  • Writing Contests
  • Standards for a Genealogical Research Reports
  • Introduction to Writing Articles
  • Book Projects

Sign up today for Writing for Genealogy: Articles, Blogs, Research Report and so much more and receive 25% off (use Promo Code: new25w).

Personal Historian: Telling the Story

Telling the stories of our ancestors must go beyond the basics of names, dates, and places. We can use those pieces as a foundation but must, as a home builder does, add layers and stories to that foundation. This course will help you add a Personal Historian component to your business by demonstrating the many layers available. Those layers add depth to both personal and client projects and additional revenue streams to a business.

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Adding a Personal Historian Business component
  • Educational Opportunities
  • Genealogists and Personal Historians
  • Interviewing
  • Add Layers of Historical Research
  • Communication and Interviewing
  • Transcribing the Oral History Interview
  • Photo Skills
  • Biography Writing
  • Legacy Letters or Ethical Wills
  • Memoir Writing
  • Consulting
  • Archiving, Preservation, Conservation
  • Project Management and Consulting
  • Niche Products and Services
  • Histories and Tributes

Register for this course today and save 25% when you use the Promo Code: new25w.

Register Today!

Register now for these course and save 25% off. But hurry this special discount is for one week only.

About The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies, leaders in online genealogy education, has been offering genealogy and history courses for over 14 years. We now offer over 200 courses in genealogical studies to help enhance researcher’s skills.

For those looking to acquire more formal educational training, The National Institute offers Certificate Programs in the records of Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Ireland, Scotland and the United States, as well as a General Methodology, Professional Development and a Librarianship Certificate Program.

For more information please call us toll-free in North America at 1-800-580-0165 or email us at admin@genealogicalstudies.com.

 

My Presentation Assignment: Lecture Course Final Module

Shannon Bennett, Student

On January 9th I gave my virtual presentation for Lecturing Skills Including Preparation. I was very nervous. More nervous than I have been in a long time, mainly because I knew I wouldn’t be able to see my audience.  That to me was the biggest hurdle. Not being able to gauge my audience’s reactions.

 Image courtesy of Rasmus Thomsen/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Rasmus Thomsen/ FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In the middle of the course we were given the assignment of picking a topic for our virtual presentation.  As it was only 30 minutes long I knew that I would not be able to go very in-depth, but I didn’t want to do just a how-to or a beginner’s lecture. That just isn’t interesting to me and I wanted people to want to come hear me lecture. I chose to speak on a subject that I had personal research experience in, Virginia Chancery Records.

Staying within the course guidelines proved to be difficult for me. However, it made me think in ways that I had not before and also made me have a few ah-ha moments. When I was writing my presentaion handout it was very difficult to keep to the page limit. In the past when I have given a lecture I would essentially provide a multi-page outline of everything I was going to talk about. I did this so people didn’t have to take notes if they didn’t want to. However, after reading the lessons in the course I can see how a 1-2 page handout is so much nicer. For my handout I wrote about the history of these records, where to find them, and why they are important. All things that I covered more in-depth during my presentation, but written out succinctly in an easy to read format.

Continue reading

The Business of Genealogy: Lecture Course Modules 3 and 4

Image courtesy of Jeroen van Oostrom. FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Jeroen van Oostrom. FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Shannon Bennett, Student

These last two modules of Lecturing Skills Including Preparation were pretty intense for me. There was a lot of information given on speaking, venues, and building your business. That word, “business,” gave me pause. Sometimes it still amazes me that people can make a living at “doing genealogy” as a few of my relatives put it. Of course, being able to have a career doing something that I love would be beyond wonderful.

I was very happy to find a section on contracts. The idea of writing a contract is intimidating to me. For a while I hoped that other people would provide me with one, or that I really wouldn’t need a contract for speaking. Well, I now know I was wrong! Boy, I will never, ever, do a presentation without one again.

The following paragraph really made me think about what a contract is for:

(c) 2013 National Institute for Genealogical Studies

(c) 2013 National Institute for Genealogical Studies

Continue reading

Preparing to Present: Lecturing Skills Including Presentation

 

Man At Lectern by renjith krishnan

Image courtesy of renjith krishnan/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Shannon Bennett, Student

In the introduction to the course Lecturing Skills Including Preparation,  author Thomas MacEntee writes how he became the genealogy speaker he is today.  Guess what? There was no magic formula, just a lot of hard work.  I figured this was the case, but you know that I was secretly hoping there would be an inkling of a formula.  Well, I will just have to keep reading and see if I can figure out my own personal formula to becoming a successful speaker.

The first two modules of this course led the students through creating a biography and resume to use for speaking engagements.  We were also given the basics on how to write a lecture description, handout, and slides.  Yes, it was a lot of information, but it is what will help lead us to becoming successful presenters. I even learned some tips that I had not thought of before, which I can use in the future for PowerPoint presentations.

Below is the sample outline we were given as a suggestion to organize our lecture descriptions.

Image Mods 1 and 2

While not all of this information may be needed for each lecture proposal, it is a great checklist to have on hand.  In the end I did modify it to make it my own and reflect my writing style.  That is the great thing about a template. Of course over time things may get tweaked again, but that is why you created it in the first place.  If you do the template right you should need to only correct it a couple of times and afterwards you should be able to use it for quite a while.

To my template I added a header so that even if I have multiple pages my name will always be front and center.  I also realized that I like to write in a narrative style more than a list style.  In the future I think I will use the bold bullet points as section headers and the sub points as suggestions on what should go into those main points.  That may prove impractical, but I like the flow better and prefer it to  a series of bullet points.

This template looks like it will be a great way to organize thoughts, ideas, and proposals for future presentations as well.  In addition I can see using it regularly for brainstorming sessions.  Also, it is a great way to keep all of your information on one topic together.  One way this could work would be by making this your main page or a table of contents for your proposals on your computer.  Saving the file names for various sections to this main page so you know where your files are, and in some cases which devices they are stored.

I can also see how this could be your way of selling yourself and your presentation to a future selection committee for an organization you would like to speak to.  You have to be clear and concise but still sound interesting.  Your goal is to get selected and the committee’s goal is to attract conference attendance by offering great presentations.  By the end of these two modules I can really see how fine a balancing act this could be.

Off to the next modules.  See you online!

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