The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Summer Surprise!!


 

 

 

 

We have a Summer Surprise! Watch this space for the reveal on July 11th.

2019 Ontario Genealogical Society Annual Conference

OGS Conference

Canada’s largest annual gathering of family historians, the Ontario Genealogical Society’s Annual Conference, will be in London, Ontario from June 21st to the 23rd at the London Convention Center.

via Ontario Genealogical Society

So many activities are planned… Opening Ceremonies begin Friday evening, followed by a jam-packed program with lecture streams for Saturday and Sunday. Don’t forget about Marketplace, as it is a vital stop for attendees to network with OGS branches, OGS special interest groups, and vendors alike.

There’s something for everyone at this conference…

Do you have ancestors from England, Ireland, Scotland, The United States, Eastern Europe, The Netherlands, Spain, Mexico, or Southern America and naturally Canada?  There are lectures on each of these countries!

Do you know what treasures can be found at Library & Archives Canada or in the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, or how to plan a trip to your ancestral village? Yup! There will be lectures on these topics also.

Do you know how to share your family history findings through blogging, publishing or using YouTube, or what about holding a virtual family reunion? Lots of information about newspapers records, death & burial records, English asylum records & health records in Canada, WW1 and vets.

You are right, there will be sessions on each of these topics.

And naturally, no conference would be complete without figuring out what you need to know about Y-DNA, Y-Haplogroups, and DNA matches.

While at the conference, you might also meet many students from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies’ program. Half of the presenters at this year’s conference are either students, past and current, graduates, consultants or authors for our course materials. You may have taken a course prepared by Ruth Blair PLCGS, Kirsty Gray, Marian Press, John Reid or Glenn Wright, or you may have attended our Canadian virtual meetings lead by Kathryn Lake Hogan PLCGS. John Boeren from The Netherlands is in our 2019 Graduation class! Others have taken courses in the past.

Drop by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies’ booth in Marketplace to say hi, and meet the newest addition to our team, Angela Rodesky.

For more details: https://conference2019.ogs.on.ca/

Family History Research

Before you start your family history research

What can be better than researching your family history?! While it is a fulfilling pursuit it is also a lot of work. You should expect to run into some problems along the way. It’s important though, that you not create your own frustrations by making mistakes in the initial stages of your research.

A couple of don’ts

  • Don’t make any assumptions.
  • Don’t believe anything you are told unless it can be confirmed by documentation.

Beware of stories suggesting royal or noble descent. Most of our first ancestors had occupations connected to agriculture and the land. The most important order of action is to always start with the known and find your way to the unknown.

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Whose genealogy do you want to trace?

As early on as you can in your project, you should try to make this decision. You may want to trace just your father’s ancestor, or perhaps a maternal line, or all of your children’s ancestors. If you research all four grandparents’ families, then you are tracing your complete lineage, both female and male ancestors. The number of ancestors you will find will double for each generation completed. If you are successful in researching 10 generations, you will have 1022 ancestors.

Our course, Methodology-Part 1: Getting Started, will assist you in using correct research methodology as you trace your family tree.

Genealogy?

What does Genealogy mean?

A definition found in the dictionary states that “genealogy is the science of tracing your family back through the centuries.” Genealogies record the descent of an individual or a family from a certain ancestor.  It is the study of your pedigree.

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What the dictionary does not explain is the fun and the challenge you can have as you climb your family tree. Think of genealogy as a big, huge puzzle. And you are but one piece of that puzzle.

The mystery in this puzzle is that once you get started, you never know where you’re going or what you’ll find once you get there. With our Methodology-Part 1: Getting Started course you will learn more about these genealogy puzzle pieces. 

 

National Genealogical Society Conference

The National Genealogical Society Family History Conference, “Journey of Discovery”, will be taking place May 7th 11th and we here at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies are excited. Why are we excited? Because we will be attending! 

Image courtesy of Angela Rodesky

We enjoy meeting with our current students, those who have graduated, and new students. No matter where you are at in your genealogy education, we have courses for you. I’m sure you have questions for us so please stop by our booth and visit with Louise St Denis and Angela Rodesky they will be more than happy to answer all of your questions.  

Plus, while there don’t forget to register for your FREE complimentary course just for attending the conference. 

Ohio Genealogical Society Conference

The Ohio Genealogical Society Conference, “Building A Heritage”, will be taking place May 1st – 4th and we here at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies are excited. Why are we excited? Because we will be attending! 

Image courtesy of Angela Rodesky

We enjoy meeting with our current students, those who have graduated, and new students. No matter where you are at in your genealogy education, we have courses for you. I’m sure you have questions for us so please stop by our booth and visit with Angela Rodesky she will be more than happy to answer all of your questions.  

Plus, while there don’t forget to register for your FREE complimentary course just for attending the conference. 

2019 Alberta Conference Winner

Join us in a round of applause congratulating, Craig Newton.

Image courtesy of Louise St Denis

 

Craig was the winner of our drawing for $1,000 worth of courses during the 2019 Alberta Genealogical Society Conference. Louise had a wonderful time speaking with all of you during the conference. Thank you for stopping by the booth with all of your questions and comments. We want to thank the Alberta Genealogical Society for all of their hard work.

May 2019 Conferences

April is almost over and we at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies are looking forward to May. Will we see you at one of the following conferences? Make sure to check out the exhibit hall, stop by our booth, and visit with us. We look forward to seeing you!

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  1. May 1st – 4th  Ohio Genealogical Society Conference – “Building A Heritage” at the Great Wolf Lodge in Mason, OH
  2. May 7th – 11th  National Genealogical Society Conference – “Journey of Discovery”  at the St. Charles Convention Center in St. Charles, MO
  3. May 30th – June 2nd  Southern California Genealogical Society – “Jamboree 2019 – 50th Birthday Bash” at the Los Angeles Marriot, Burbank Airport Hotel in Burbank, CA

Your Family Photographs

Handling and Storing   

Older photographs are fragile and easily damaged. The best way to reduce damage is to not handle photographs at all. Since that is not always practical, gloves should be worn when they are handled. Gloves prevent transferring dirt and skin oils on the delicate images. When handling images, put on the gloves and hold the prints by their edges.  

If the photo is a cabinet card or a carte de visite, do not remove the photo from the cardstock on which they are mounted. Those vintage images were printed on very thin paper that will not survive removal from their cardstock backing.  

Photography: Clues Pictures Hold, Editing, Digitizing & Various Projects

Storage 

Photographs should be stored using archival safe products such as archival sleeves, envelopes, unbuffered tissue paper, and boxes that are available online from archival supply stores. Some examples of archival storage include:  

  • Store case-mounted photographs such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, or domed glass frames in their original cases/frames. Wrap them individually in unbuffered archival tissue paper and then place in an archival safe box.  
  • Store black-and-white prints, black-and-white negatives, color prints and negatives in their own individual sleeves. The sleeves can be stored together in the same archival box.  
  • Store negatives in polypropylene or polyester sleeves. 
  • Store original albums separately in their own archival boxes.   

Most archival safe storage boxes come in different sizes and their metal corners allow for stacking and prevent the corners and contents from being crushed. 

Photographs are an important part of telling a family history. Learning how to handle and care for those photos is just one of the topics taught in our Photography: Clues Pictures Hold, Editing, Digitizing and Various Projects course.

 

Death Indexes Online

US Death Indexes 

There are many different death indexes online. Please note that most indexes do not include every year. Remember that a name in an index is not proof that this is the researcher’s person! Often the person you are seeking is not the first to have this name and won’t be the last! Never assume the indexed name is your person and stop your research at that point.  

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Always be creative in finding various ways to search for what you might be seeking. Go to the FamilySearch website and choose Catalog from the Search drop-down menu. Another way to search is to conduct a Place search and then enter the name of the county and state.  

One other place to check for online death indexes is Google. Conduct a Google search on the phrase, free “death index.”  

Research Plan 

Go beyond the index. Creating a research plan for more documents is necessary. The first item on the research plan should be finding an obituary. Next, would be checking with the cemetery where the individual was interred. Personalize a research plan to your needs. If you do not have the exact date of death, then the research continues. With our United States: Vital Records course you will learn more about researching and locating a death index.  

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