The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Transcription Tuesday – Colonial Records

One of The National Institute for Genealogical Studies courses that requires a good foundation of Transcription Skills, is our Research: US Colonial New England Ancestors course. The next course is scheduled to begin on Monday, January 3rd, 2022. To check for future start dates, look under the Register tab on the course web page, or check the Course Calendar here

Research: U.S. Colonial New England Ancestors
Course Description: This seven-module course will give the student a basic foundation to research using colonial records in New England. It focuses primarily on the most common records used for research. The student will learn about strategies for finding colonial New England records while incorporating colonial town records, colonial census records, colonial land records and maps, the colonial wars, religious records, and court documents. 

The student who undertakes this course should have familiarity with United States vital, religious, census, land and military records, as well as have a good knowledge of genealogical methodologies. 

Course Content
This course introduces you to Colonial New England research through websites and state resources. It will provide strategies for finding Colonial New England records during the time period leading up to the American Revolution. As you discover these valuable and genealogically-rich documents, you will be faced with the major challenge of deciphering Colonial Handwriting. It is recommended to transcribe these documents to glean all the information they contain and every clue they provide. Transcriptions of the original documents will make future references a lot easier. Making Abstracts will be useful for a summary of what each document contains.

To facilitate developing your Transcription Skills, we have two books to recommend:
Reading Early American Handwriting by Kip Sperry
Understanding Colonial Handwriting by Harriet Stryker-Rodda
Both of these books are available to order through our online Genealogy Store on our website.

Once you are ready to explore Colonial records, you should familiarize yourself with the area of your research. Build a timeline and record a brief history of the early settlement of the town. By building a location guide for each town, you will be able to gather information about which resources are available, including early genealogies that were created. 

Colonial Town Records are fascinating and include: Different Types of Colonial Town Records, Freemen and Inhabitancy, Town Officers, Town Business, Tax Records, Licenses, Ear Marks, Manumissions, School Records, and Poor Records; as well as Vital Records and Cemetery Records. There were Colonial Censuses taken. Some surviving records include:  Published Census, Reconstructed Census Lists, and Census Substitutes of the 17th and 18th centuries. 

This course will discuss Strategies for research, tracking Immigration, and look at Court Records. Land Records and Maps will be examined, through the Common Terminology used in this time period and will look at some Land Grants. Understanding your research location through Maps and Gazetteers will help you to determine where to look for records. It will conclude with Military Records, Religious Records, and Colonial Court Records. 

ALL of these records will require the ability to read and decipher Colonial Handwriting. By transcribing each document, you will become more familiar with how the letters are formed and the common language used in each type of record. 

Transcription Skills are developed with PRACTICE. The more original documents you can transcribe, the easier it will become. There are no shortcuts. It is a skill that is developed. Use the reference tools available to you. Study the scripts common to the time period and location of your research. Purpose to become an excellent Transcriber.
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As researchers, we have found that there are many skills we need to employ in order to achieve success in our future research projects. Transcription Tuesday will share guidelines and practical suggestions to help our readers to develop the skills for making effective transcriptions, abstracts, and extractions.

Transcription Tuesday previous blog post
Transcription Tuesday Index
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These three core courses demonstrate Transcription principles. They are offered monthly, beginning on the first Monday of every month: Register today!
Methodology-Part 2: Organizing and Skill-Building 
Skills: Transcribing, Abstracting & Extracting 
Palaeography: Reading & Understanding Historical Documents 
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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com 
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION since 1997 

Our Recent American Records Graduates

Continuing to post Congratulations to Our Recent Graduates 
**Please see previous blog post with a Message from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies to all recent graduates.

What an impressive achievement! It took a lot of hard work, patience, and determination to reach your goal. It is time to celebrate the success of all our recent graduates. We are so very proud of all of you. 

Introducing the Graduates of the American Records Certificate between June 2019 and October 2021.

AMERICAN CERTIFICATE
Bette Bohman, PLCGS  
Lynda Carter, PLCGS   
Linda Christensen, PLCGS
Amy Clounch, PLCGS   
Karin Coppernoll, PLCGS  
Sherrie Craun, PLCGS  
Stephanie Cutter, PLCGS 
Julie Eaklor, PLCGS  
Gaynol Fales, PLCGS  
Pamela Groth, PLCGS 
Laura Hall, PLCGS  
Kim Hanks, PLCGS  
Margaret Hodges, PLCGS  
Lynne Jakobowski, PLCGS  
Ruth Jolly, PLCGS  
Debra Kabinier, PLCGS  
Susan Kaplan, PLCGS 
Misti Layne, PLCGS   
Brian Maclachlan, PLCGS   
Sharon Marsh, PLCGS  
Lynne Moore McCreery, PLCGS   
Ginger Muenster, PLCGS  
Katie Myers, PLCGS  
Janet Neel, PLCGS   
Rebecca Novy, PLCGS   
Scott Roberts, PLCGS   
Jennifer Smith, PLCGS   
Christina Tracy, PLCGS 
Stephen Van Bibber, PLCGS  
Justina Vickerman, PLCGS   
Heather Weaver, PLCGS 

Warmest congratulations to all our graduates… 

Louise St Denis and our team at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies 
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Graduates have completed all requirements for our 40-course American Records Certificate, which includes the following compulsory American Records courses: 

Basic Level 
US: Census Records
US: Land Records
US: Religious Records-Part 1
US: Vital Records, Understanding and Using the Records

Intermediate Level 
US: Cemetery and Mortuary Records
US: Immigration & Naturalization Records
US: Migration Patterns
US: Probate Records
US: Religious Records-Part 2

Advanced Level 
US: Court Records
US: Institutional Records
US: Military Records
US: Newspaper Records
US: Occupational Records
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To recognize all of our graduates throughout the years, please go to our website at www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on the menu item INSTITUTE, and then GRADUATES. Be patient, the list is long and therefore takes time to display.

For a full list of Certificates from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies, please visit our website.
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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com 
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION since 1997

Colonial Period Courses

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers online genealogical education for family history enthusiasts, genealogists and historians. Our courses are offered in Basic, Intermediate, or Advanced levels. You can register for courses individually, or receive a discount by choosing from a variety of packages. These are bundled either by specific theme or customized to your own interests.
See the Full List of Packages here. 

The Start Dates for courses are usually scheduled for the first Monday of the month, however, not all courses are available monthly. Be sure to check our Current Course Calendar for the dates when the courses of your choice are scheduled to open again.

In our list of courses, there are four courses covering the Colonial period of the Eastern United States, focusing on the original Thirteen Colonies. These are valuable resources for anyone researching in this region and timeframe.

Research: Mayflower Ancestors
This course studies some of the very first settlers of Massachusetts. Learn how to properly document a descendant line by utilizing New England original and derivative records as well as sources specific to Mayflower research. Following their story and tracing each consecutive generation is a great way to recognize the 400+ years since their arrival in North America.
Course Description for Research: Mayflower Ancestors

Research: US Colonial New England Ancestors
This course explores strategies for finding Colonial New England records while incorporating colonial town records, colonial census records, colonial land records and maps, the colonial wars, religious records, and court documents. Note: This is an Intermediate course.
Course Description for Research: US Colonial New England Ancestors

The American Revolutionary War was a major historical event which impacted many Colonial families. It is hard to imagine that any family was left unaffected. Many families were divided, with multiple factors leading to which side they eventually chose to pledge their loyalty to. If you reach a brick wall in your research during this time period, be sure to check both Loyalist and Patriot resources. Sometimes you will find family members on both sides as they navigated through this turbulent time in their lives. This was also a time of major migrations and relocations.

Fortunately, there were numerous records created and preserved during the colonial period. Thankfully, various organizations have worked to digitize as many of the surviving records as possible. We just need to know how to access them to document our family’s stories and the part they played in these historical events.

Research: United Empire Loyalist Ancestors
This course describes what it meant to be a United Empire Loyalist in the context of the American Revolutionary War and how it affected their ensuing lives. We also discuss the membership and lineage requirements of the United Empire Loyalists Association of Canada (UELAC.org). Records include: military, claims, land, and other records that will assist with documenting your UEL ancestor. British North American colonies where the Loyalists went for resettlement include Upper Canada (Ontario)—where the original U.E. (Unity of Empire) tradition really took hold—the Maritime provinces, and Lower Canada (Quebec).
Course Description for Research: United Empire Loyalist Ancestors 

US: Military Records (includes Revolutionary War)
This course includes records of conflicts in the United States and colonial America from the early colonial wars of the seventeenth century to the Revolutionary War, as well as the records of later conflicts to WW2. What is required for Military and Lineage Societies may be of particular interest as there is discussion of the various types of records created by military service, such as service records, muster rolls, pension records, and draft registration. Note: This is an advanced course.
Course Description for US: Military Records

Course Packages
Registration for these four courses could be submitted at a discount by choosing:
Course Package – 4 Courses 

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Virtual Meetings

We have Virtual Meetings scheduled on Wednesday, May 19th. Hope you will join us for a session, if applicable to your studies and/or research. Also, note three May virtual meetings have been postponed until Wednesday, May 26th. Details are outlined below.

You can enhance your learning experience by joining a virtual meeting regarding your studies and asking questions. Even if you don’t have questions, you are welcome to just listen, lurk and learn! We don’t mind in the least!

Remember, these Virtual Meetings are NOT mandatory. They are a fun and interactive way to ask questions about the courses and/or research at a relevant session.

***IMPORTANT*** New Adobe Connect information and instructions are available on our website. If you are experiencing any issues when attending a virtual meeting, please obtain the INSTRUCTIONS document in PDF format near the top right of our Virtual Learning Room page on our website.

Go to www.genealogicalstudies.com
In top menu bar, select Information.
In the dropdown menu, select Virtual Learning Room.
Click on Instructions near the top right (you may have to scroll over to the right).

The PDF document has Adobe Connect information, Troubleshooting steps, and Adobe Connect Technical Support contacts.
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***CHECK SCHEDULED TIME IN YOUR TIME ZONE***
Go to www.genealogicalstudies.com
In top menu bar, select Information.
In the dropdown menu, select Virtual Learning Room.
Click the virtual meeting name in list (a new window will open).
Click on Check Time to see the time in your local time zone.
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Internet Tools with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Wednesday, May 19th at 7:30 PM Eastern
LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/internettools/

Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program – GENERAL DISCUSSION with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This Virtual Meeting is more appropriate for students registered in these courses. The instructor will be available to provide guidance and answer questions regarding any aspect of these courses.
Wednesday, May 19th at 9:00 PM Eastern
LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asgeneral/
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POSTPONED SESSIONS WITH NEW DATES:

Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program-Part 1 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This Virtual Meeting is more appropriate for students registered in this course. Please read the article “Heritage Books and Family Lore: A Jackson Test in Missouri and Idaho” by Connie Lenzen (NGSQ Vol. 86, No. 1, March, 1998). Follow the directions found in your course material.
Wednesday, May 26th at 11:30 AM Eastern
LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle1/

Methodology courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Wednesday, May 26th at 5:00 PM Eastern
LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/

American Records courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Wednesday, May 26th at 6:30 PM Eastern
LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/
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TO JOIN A VIRTUAL MEETING, simply click on the URL or enter the URL provided in your browser. Alternatively, you can download the Adobe Connect Desktop App (see instructions above) to attend the virtual meetings. When joining a session, a USERNAME or PASSWORD is NOT REQUIRED. Please type in your first name & surname initial, along with your geographical location; then click Enter as a Guest.
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LISTEN ON THE GO
Want to listen to the virtual meeting, but will not be at your computer? No problem! You can download the FREE Adobe Connect Mobile App from the Apple App Store (for iPod/iPhone/iPad) or from the Google Play Store (for Android).
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See the calendar of future Virtual Meetings sessions at www.genealogicalstudies.com; in the top menu, choose INFORMATION, and then VIRTUAL LEARNING ROOM in the drop-down menu.

If you have any questions regarding the Virtual Meetings and/or the schedule, please send an email to degroot@genealogicalstudies.com.

Sue de Groot, PLCGS
National Institute for Genealogical Studies
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The National Institute for Genealogical Studies – leaders in genealogy education since 1997. For more information on the over 230 courses that we offer to our students, visit http://www.genealogicalstudies.com.

To subscribe to our email list and receive updates, send an email to admin@genealogicalstudies.com.
—————————————————-
Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Register for July 2020 Courses

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers online genealogical education for family history enthusiasts, genealogy researchers and historians. These courses are rated in Basic, Intermediate, or Advanced levels. You can register for any course individually, or save by choosing from a variety of available packages. See Full List of Packages here: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/packages.asp 

The Start Dates for courses are usually scheduled for the first Monday of the month, however, not all courses are available monthly. Be sure to check our Current Course Calendar  for when the course of your choice is scheduled to be opened again.

In the list of courses scheduled for July 2020, there are four courses covering the Colonial period of the Eastern United States. These are valuable resources for anyone researching in this area and time frame.

Research: Mayflower Ancestors
This course studies some of the very first settlers of Massachusetts. Learn how to properly document a descendant line by utilizing New England original and derivative records as well as sources specific to Mayflower research. Following their story and tracing each generation is a great way to celebrate the 400th year anniversary of their arrival to North America.
Course Description: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp?courseID=265 
Note: This course is currently being offered in our list of discounted courses. Receive 50% off by using the Code: ngs50. Code expires on 30 June 2020. See Discount details here: http://blog.genealogicalstudies.com/2020/05/discount-codes-for-may-and-june-2020/

Research: US Colonial New England Ancestors
This course explores strategies for finding Colonial New England records while incorporating colonial town records, colonial census records, colonial land records and maps, the colonial wars, religious records, and court documents. Note: This is an Intermediate course.
Course Description: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp?courseID=503 

The American Revolutionary War was a major historical event which impacted many Colonial families. It is hard to imagine that any family was left unaffected. Many families were divided, with multiple factors leading to which side they chose to pledge their loyalty to. If you reach a brick wall in your research during this time period, be sure to check both Loyalist and Patriot resources. Sometimes you will find family members on both sides. This was a time of major migrations and relocations. Fortunately, they left many records. We just need to document their stories.

Research: United Empire Loyalist Ancestors
This course describes what it meant to be a United Empire Loyalist in the context of the American Revolutionary War and how it affected their ensuing lives. We also discuss the membership and lineage requirements of the United Empire Loyalists Association of Canada. Records include: military, claims, land, and other records that will assist with documenting your UEL ancestor. British North American colonies where the Loyalists came for resettlement include Upper Canada (Ontario)—where the original U.E. (Unity of Empire) tradition took hold—the Maritime provinces and Lower Canada (Quebec).
Course Description: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp?courseID=315 

US: Military Records
This course covers conflicts of the United States and colonial America from the early colonial wars of the seventeenth century to the Second World War. The Revolutionary War records are included in Module 3. Note: This is an advanced course.
Course Description: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp?courseID=215

Course Packages
Registration for these four courses could be submitted as Course Package – 4 Courses: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/packages.asp?packageID=40 
Note: Packages are currently being offered at a discount of 15% off by using the Code: ngs15. Code expires on 30 June 2020.
See Discount details here: http://blog.genealogicalstudies.com/2020/05/discount-codes-for-may-and-june-2020/

Full List of Packageshttps://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/packages.asp
Complete List of Courses: https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp

Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

 

New Course: Research US Midwestern States Ancestors

By Samuel Augustus Mitchell - Mitchell's new general atlas, containing maps of the various countries of the World, plans of cities, etc. (1867 edition) Wikimedia Commons by Geographicus Rare Antique Maps, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14621278

By Samuel Augustus Mitchell – Mitchell’s new general atlas, containing maps of the various countries of the World, plans of cities, etc. (1867 edition) Wikimedia Commons by Geographicus Rare Antique Maps, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14621278

 

We have a new course starting in May at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Written by Cari Taplin, CG, Research: U.S. Midwestern States Ancestors is designed to give students a basic understanding of some of the historical events that occurred in each state, especially events that shaped the state’s history, boundaries, laws, and records. The states included in this course were all part of the Louisiana Purchase of 1803: Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Each state is unique in its geographical formation, social attitudes, political structure, ethnicity, industry and historical records. The modules included are aimed at giving researchers information to aid understanding of these states individually and to provide tools for researching family history, not only in terms of the individual, but also in their broader social context.

Professional genealogist and course author Cari Taplin, CG points out, “As the country expanded from east to west, our ancestors traveled through and sometimes stayed in the midwestern states. Researching in those states is vital to most family history research. The rich and unique history of each state is interesting and can be very rewarding. Learning about the nuances of the region will improve your research skills and bring life to your genealogy.”

To learn more about this course, see our website. Research: U.S. Midwestern States Ancestors starts May 2nd. Register today!

Societies and Immigrants

Opening night, Masonic May Festival, Washington, May 23, [19]06. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/pan.6a34800/

Opening night, Masonic May Festival, Washington, May 23, [19]06. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/pan.6a34800/

 

By Shannon Combs-Bennett, Student

I am a member of a fraternity. No, seriously.  While it may not be as impressive as some of the fraternal orders our ancestors were a part of I am super proud to be a member of a professional fraternity. Best part, these types of organizations keep records. Which is what the last module of the course US Immigration and Naturalization Records taught us.

Module 6 was on the subject of ethnic sources, societies, and newspapers. Once again, I felt left out since it didn’t directly affect my personal story, but the information was very enthralling. I honestly had no idea about many of the sources discussed or the groups that were active in  different ethnic communities. In the future I am sure this information will help me with research into other people’s lineages.

The majority of the chapter was about societies. I liked that our instructor broke them up by the type of society. The sections were: fraternal, ethnic, and charitable. While many people belong to several different types of societies, I thought it was important to note that there was not a standard way they all functioned. Each was formed for a different reason, with a different mission statement, and different entry rules. That being said I did not know so many of them kept such extensive records.

The one I knew kept great records was the Free Masons. I have ancestors who were Free Masons and have worked on locating those records. No luck yet on getting them, but one day I will.

There were a number of Irish ethnic societies. I would guess that is because of the large number of Irish who settled in the United States. Also, many of the charitable societies were also Irish based.  The records available from these groups would be amazing for any genealogist who can find their ancestors among their rolls. Particularly the member biographies that were often written.

I was impressed with the course and learned a lot more about these types of records than I thought I would.  Once again, you never know where you will pick up a new tip. Good luck researching your ancestors and see you online!

Passports and the Immigrant

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Passport Applications: Chicago, New York City, New Orleans, San Francisco and Seattle, 1914-1925; Collection Number: ARC Identifier 1246000 / MLR Number A1 535; Box #: 4161; Volume #: 1via Ancestry.com

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; Passport Applications: Chicago,
New York City, New Orleans, San Francisco and Seattle, 1914-1925; Collection Number: ARC Identifier
1246000 / MLR Number A1 535; Box #: 4161; Volume #: 1 via Ancestry.com

By Shannon Combs-Bennett, Student

Ok, I am chugging right along through the US Immigration and Naturalization Records course and modules 3 and 4 were very cool.  Module 4 was a lot of new material for me, particularly since I have not spent a lot of time learning about Canadian border crossings. No one in my family (that I have found) ever came through Canada. My husband however is a different story. His great-grandparents nearly starved to death (according to his mother) trying to farm in Alberta from 1920-1922 before going on to Washington state to settle.

While that was very interesting I was fascinated to read about the US passport regulations.  Nowadays we take it for granted that if you want to leave the country you need to get a passport.  It is a very simple process, and they are handy forms of government identification.  I did not realize  that this was not the law until 1941.

Personally, I think passport applications are an underused resource for genealogists and should be used a heck of a lot more. Especially if you know your ancestor traveled a lot, either for fun or for business.  I learned this last year when I helped a friend start her genealogy journey.  Her great-grandfather traveled back and forth to Central America for work and the information on his application actually broke down a huge brick wall on where her family came from. She learned that his father was born in Scotland and what his name was!

The last section of the module was on ports of emigration. One day I am sure they will come in handy for me, as soon as I figure out where those pesky ancestors came from. I did not realize how many ports still have a significant amount of records. With all of the destruction from World War I and World War II. I know that many places have no records left. Needless to say it gives me hope!

Next time I will be talking about the last modules of the course. Should be interesting since one of the subjects will be on fraternal orders. See you online!

Immigrant Origins

Group of emigrants (women and children) from eastern Europe on deck of the S.S. Amsterdam. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/91482252/resource/

Group of emigrants (women and children) from eastern Europe on deck of the S.S. Amsterdam. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/91482252/resource/

 

By Shannon Combs-Bennett, Student

Oh Module 2, you are my savior! Yes, in this module we delved into strategies for locating those pesky immigrant ancestor’s origins. Now, did it personally help me? No, not yet. I do hold out hope though that this module laid the groundwork for successful future research.

Frequently, it may be said that  these courses pack a lot of information into a short amount of pages. I felt it was particularly helpful that this module was broken into 3 sections:

  • Only the country of origin is known
  • Only the county, district, or region of origin in known
  • Specific place of origin  is known

Seeing as all of my family fall into section 1, I studied the other sections for that day when I have a break through!

In each section the instructor walked us through how to work with the information we have. He talked about clues we could use to find more information. Also listing many resources to research to determine if there are any hidden gems out there. There is even discussion on using foreign record sets when applicable. Unfortunately, you have to know the place name for your ancestor before that is a viable option in most cases.

In section 2 PERSI was brought up.  PERSI, or the Periodical Source Index, is a great tool and I was excited to see it brought up in this course.  If you have never heard of PERSI, the  Family Search wiki has a great entry on it. Created by the staff from the Allen County Public Library Foundation and their Genealogy Center, PERSI is fast becoming a great research tool for genealogists.

PERSI is a subject index of articles that are of interest to genealogists.  Just as a warning, it is NOT an every name or every word index. For my own research, PERSI has lead me to some great articles not only about my family but also the areas they were from. For immigration and naturalization purposes the instructor suggests we use PERSI to look to titles of articles concerning our surnames and the county names our ancestors are from. Then we can retrieve the articles and determine if they hold information for us. Warning, it is such a great tool you can lose hours there.

The next two modules will cover an ancestor’s immigration, border crossings, and emigration records.  Lots of good information I am sure!

See you online!

 

Starting US Immigration and Naturalization Records

The naturalization of foreigners in New York City - Judge McCunn sitting in the Superior Court, passing on applications for citizenship, Friday evening, October 22, 1869. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3c21666/

The naturalization of foreigners in New York City – Judge McCunn sitting in the Superior Court, passing on applications for citizenship, Friday evening, October 22, 1869. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3c21666/

By Shannon Combs-Bennett, Student

If you live in the United States it is a good chance that you or your family came here from somewhere else. People from all over the world have immigrated to the United States in its 239 year existence making us truly a nation of immigrants. However, for genealogists, learning about those brave souls who traveled here, many times under desperate circumstances, can be the bane of our existence. Why, oh why, couldn’t they just once put down the town they came from!

The course I am taking now  is United States: Immigration and Naturalization Records, which hopefully will help me locate my elusive immigrant ancestry along the way. Or at least I can hope, right?

Looking through the syllabus there appears to be a lot of great information covered. A weakness for me is immigration after 1870. The reason? Well, that is when the last of my and my husband’s ancestors came to the US. Due to that fact I have not invested a lot of time in learning about 20th and 21st century immigration and naturalization.  It will take all I have to pay extra attention in those instances but the knowledge will help me I am sure.

While the course seems to be centered on those of European descent I am hopefull that the section which covers the US laws will still be of interest to others. I mean, everyone who wants to immigrate goes through the same process no matter if they are from Europe or Asia.

The section on naturalization records will be interesting. I don’t know about you, but there are times I struggle to remember which law went into effect when for this topic. It seems for the first hundred years of our country there was a new way to do things every decade. I wonder how the people immigrating here kept up!  This could be a great reason to make a timeline or flow chart!

So it is off to another course!  See you online!

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