The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Research Using Internet Tools

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers comprehensive online education to enhance your genealogical knowledge and provide skill building research techniques. Whether you are just starting your family research, or you are interested in pursuing one of our Certificates in Genealogical Studies programs, you will need to learn the basics of navigating the Internet environment. These courses go beyond genealogical methodology or basic computer skills as they lay the foundation for successful online research. They are a must for every family historian.
Three Basic Courses

Google for the Wise Genealogist 
This course explores Google programs and how they can be used to research family history. Google is the best non-genealogy, genealogy website there is!

Social Media Tools for Genealogists 
By using social media tools, you can connect with researchers worldwide, find distant relations, curate content, and share your research. This course provides you with just some of the tools you will need to help you take advantage of various websites and demonstrates how social media is all about sharing, education, mobility and yes, networking.

Connecting Family Online & Virtually
Computers and the Internet have revolutionized the way families communicate. This course highlights specific ways to use your computer and the Internet to build and strengthen family ties while conducting your family research. By exploring various topics, participants will discover ways to find long lost cousins and stay in touch with distant relatives.

Monthly Virtual Meetings

Our Monthly Virtual Meetings are a way for students and guests to communicate with the National Institute for Genealogical Studies’ instructors in a fun and interactive way and provides a place to ask questions about courses and/or research. Whether you are curious, or even if you have already completed all three of courses, these meetings provide valuable tips and suggestions for finding and using online resources to assist us in our research. The current schedule will list all of the upcoming virtual meetings. These sessions are FREE and you do not have to be a current or past student to attend. Attendees do not need a User Name or a Password. Just type in your first and last name, along with your geographic location; then click “Enter as a Guest” to access the meeting room.

For more information about courses and events, check back to our blog and watch for social media posts on Facebook and Twitter.

Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

May Virtual Meetings

Our Monthly Virtual Meetings are a way for students and guests to communicate with the National Institute for Genealogical Studies’ instructors in a fun and interactive way and provides a place to ask questions about courses and/or research. These sessions are FREE and you do not have to be a current or past student to attend.

Attendees: NO USER NAME or PASSWORD REQUIRED. Please type in your first and last name, along with your geographic location; then click “Enter as a Guest”

May Virtual Meetings 

Eastern European courses with Lisa Alzo
Time zones: Tuesday, May 12th – 11 AM Eastern; 10 AM Central; 9 AM Mountain; 8 AM Pacific; 4 PM in London, England; Wednesday, May 13th – 1 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/easteuro/

Canadian courses with Cheryl Levy
Time zones: Tuesday, May 12th – 3 PM Eastern; 2 PM Central; 1 PM Mountain; Noon Pacific; 8 PM in London, England; Wednesday, May 13th – 5 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/canadian/

Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program – GENERAL with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Wednesday, May 13th – 10 AM Eastern; 9 AM Central; 8 AM Mountain; 7 AM Pacific; 3 PM in London, England; Thursday, May 14th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asgeneral/

Professional Development courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Wednesday, May 13th – 11:30 AM Eastern; 10:30 AM Central; 9:30 AM Mountain; 8:30 AM Pacific; 4:30 PM in London, England; Thursday, May 14th – 1:30 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/professional/

Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program-Part 1 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Wednesday, May 13th – 7 PM Eastern; 6 PM Central; 5 PM Mountain; 4 PM Pacific; Thursday, May 14th – Midnight in London, England; 9 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle1/

Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program-Part 2 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Wednesday, May 13th – 8:30 PM Eastern; 7:30 PM Central; 6:30 PM Mountain; 5:30 PM Pacific; Thursday, May 14th – 1:30 AM in London, England; 10:30 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle2/

DNA courses with Shannon Combs Bennett
Time zones: Thursday, May 14th – 10 AM Eastern; 9 AM Central; 8 AM Central; 7 AM Pacific; 3 PM in London, England; Friday, May 15th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/dna/

STUDENT LOUNGE
Time zones: Thursday, May 14th – 6 PM Eastern; 5 PM Central; 4 PM Mountain; 3 PM Pacific; 11 PM in London, England; Friday, May 15th – 8 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/lounge/

Irish courses with Brenda Wheeler
Time zones: Friday, May 22nd – 4:30 PM Eastern; 3:30 PM Central; 2:30 PM Mountain; 1:30 PM Pacific; Saturday, May 23rd – 5:30 AM in London, England; 2:30 PM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/irish/

Methodology courses with Brenda Wheeler
Time zones: Friday, May 22nd – 7:30 PM Eastern; 6:30 PM Central; 5:30 PM Mountain; 4:30 PM Pacific; Saturday, May 23rd – 8:30 AM in London, England; 5:30 PM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/

Using Internet Tools with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Tuesday, May 26th – 6 PM Eastern; 5 PM Central; 4 PM Mountain; 3 PM Pacific; 11 PM in London, England; Wednesday, May 27th – 8 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/internettools/

American courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Tuesday, May 26th – 7:30 PM Eastern; 6:30 PM Central; 5:30 PM Mountain; 4:30 PM Pacific; 12:30 AM in London, England; Wednesday, May 27th – 9:30 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/

Methodology courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: Tuesday, May 26th – 9 PM Eastern; 8 PM Central; 7 PM Mountain; 6 PM Pacific; 2 AM in London, England; Wednesday, May 27th – 11 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/    

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Calendar of Virtual Meetings is at www.genealogicalstudies.com;
Read the Instructions at www.genealogicalstudies.com/instructions.pdf.

Cultural Assimilation

Cultures involve more than just identifying specific groups of people. They actually involve deeply rooted psychological elements which tend to govern the behaviour of the members. The folkways of a family, such as traditions, foods, music, stories, etc., can be an asset when assimilating into another culture that is very similar to their own; however, it can also be a hinderance in adapting to a new environment that is glaringly different.

Exploring some of the more subtle aspects of Cultural Assimilation reveals how they impacted not only the interactions of our ancestors in their new environments, but how they may have been aided, or hampered, by the folkways of their cultural group. As you research this aspect, you will need to investigate whether our ancestors fit in easily, or if they struggled to relate. This could be especially revealing when you study the challenges they may have faced in their places of employment. Every day would have exposed new situations with so many norms for them to learn that were not “normal” to them at all. In some cultures, adapting would naturally have been easy; however, other cultural differences would emerge in stark contrast to the expected social interactions, creating uncomfortable or embarrassing situations.

By breaking down these elements and analyzing cultural identities, you can begin to piece together a picture of what our ancestors faced in their acculturation process. This could very well reveal the origins of family traits that seemed out of character, but seem to persist in the following generations.

In Demystifying Culture and Folklore, you will get a glimpse into some of the social aspects of your ancestors’ lives as they attempted to embrace a new culture, or how they struggled with conforming to a society that may not have resembled their expectations at all. Understanding these pieces of the puzzle may well explain feelings of acceptance or rejection experienced by family members.

Visit our website for a complete list of courses offered by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Our Immigrant Ancestors’ Culture

Our Immigrant Ancestors faced many challenges as they embarked on the journey of resettling in a new and foreign land. Their original root cultures traveled with them, embedded in their very being and preserved within the traditions they practiced. As we Demystifying Culture and Folklore of those bravely making these life-changing decisions, we may also discover the encounters and trials they faced. How they responded often reflects their culture’s beliefs.

When we look at How Culture Affected Our Immigrant Ancestors’ Lives, many aspects become clear. We are all familiar with the term “Culture Shock,” but have you personally experienced it? Shock says, “This is not the same as what I have been used to!” Many major changes are to be expected in our new circumstances, but there are always surprise encounters that catch us off guard with stumbling blocks and obstacles to deal with that we didn’t see coming. Misunderstandings are sure to occur as cultural differences emerge and an alternate perspective is revealed. How did our ancestors adapt to their new environments? What did they keep “from the old country” and what was exchanged for their new experiences? Their struggles were real and their stories may be revealed as you carefully explore this time period in their lives. Everyone’s story will be different, but with familiar similarities as they found their place in their new communities. Whether it was in the work place, or interacting with new neighbours, our ancestors made adjustments to fit in. It is interesting to see some strong traditions thrive, while other customs from the home country are traded or forgotten in just a few generations.

As you continue to work through the Demystifying Culture and Folklore course, you will recognize elements for their root cultures have indeed survived, although you may not have known its origins until revealed by digging deeper into your family’s traditions.

Visit our website for a complete list of courses offered by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Religious Records

The Religious beliefs of our ancestors influenced, not only their daily lives, it often impacted the direction of their life journey. It caused some to pull up roots and leave friends and family members behind in their country of origin in order to pursue emigration, and perhaps religious freedom as well. Many relocated their own families to new areas with others of similar beliefs. Wherever they were, they have left records behind that tell that part of their stories. Every country-specific certificate program includes research into this vital part of their family story. In addition to Birth, Marriage and Death records, we need to look for Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, along with other religious ceremonies, according to their beliefs and customs. Here are many of the religious records courses:

American: Religious Records – Part 1
American: Religious Records – Part 2
Australian: Church Records 
Canadian: Religious Records 
Eastern European: Church Records
English: Parish Records 
English: Poor Law & Parish Chest Records 
English: Non-Anglican Church Records 
German: Church Records 
Irish: Conformist and Non-Conformist Church Records
Italian: Catholic Church Records – Part 1 
Italian: Catholic Church Records – Part 2 
Research: Jewish Records 
Scottish: Old Parish Records 
Scottish: Beyond the OPRs 

Religious Records provide an intimate glimpse into the personal lives of its members. Three additional courses that will assist you in expanding this aspect of your ancestors’ research are listed below. Each will inspire you to dig deeper and learn what motivated the decisions they made – sometimes altering the futures of their family members for generations.

Research: Social History 
Life of Our Ancestors 
Demystifying Culture & Folklore 

The Palaeography course goes beyond looking at handwriting and transcriptions; it takes an in-depth look into a variety of historical documents, including older church records. Those may contain records written in Latin as well as the languages of their country of origin. The course material covers many of the feast days and festivals they would have attended in the church calendar, and reveals restrictions which explain why ceremonies occurred – or didn’t occur – on specific dates. The Holiday Traditions of today may be quite different than how your ancestors celebrated in their time period.

Palaeography: Reading & Understanding Historical Documents 

All of these bring greater understanding of their lives. When you are researching, take note of the religious affiliations recorded on records such as census returns or civil registrations. These could be clues for where to look for additional records in their communities. Religious Records are a valuable resource and should be included in every research project.

For a complete list of courses from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies, please visit our website.

 

 

 

Happy DNA Day!

April 25th has been named as DNA DAY under such names as: National DNA Day, International DNA Day, or World DNA Day. It commemorates the discovery of DNA’s double helix structure in 1953 and the successful completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. DNA is currently a very popular topic. Many have taken DNA tests from various companies. Now what? How do we make sense of our results and analyze what that means for ourselves and our genealogy research? There are many resources available. First, make sure to read ALL information provided by your DNA-testing organization.

The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual is one resource that is strongly recommended to explore genealogy standards and guidelines when dealing with the DNA results we reveal.

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers two specific DNA packages, which include several courses relating to DNA and genetics available to be taken individually. If you are interested in increasing your understanding of DNA, or want to learn ways to analyze your data, or how to implement strategies to organize your matches, please check out the following course descriptions more closely. Registration fees and dates are available under the Register tab for each course.


DNA – Understanding DNA Testing and Research Strategies
– 3 Course Package

DNA: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy (BASIC)

DNA: Autosomal DNA – Testing for Everyone (BASIC)

DNA: Tracing Maternal & Paternal Lines (BASIC)

DNA and Relevant Topics – 6 Course Package (The above 3 courses plus 3 more courses)

Organizing a One-Name Study (INTERMEDIATE)

Organizing a One-Place Study (INTERMEDIATE)

Genealogy Ethical Guidelines & Standards (ADVANCED)


Additional Courses with DNA elements

Forensic Genealogy (INTERMEDIATE)

Genetics & Medical Family History (ADVANCED)


Complete List of Courses here

List of Certificate Programs here

Our Primary Cultures

When Demystifying Culture and Folklore, we see that who we are is a compilation of many influences. Some of these can be traced to ancestral traditions, behavior, historical events, etc. and lead to insights about our progenitors as well as ourselves. In Module 1, we look at The Value of Folklore within a Culture. This involves identifying and understanding our root cultures and the various factors contributing to its structure. Time is spent exploring several aspects, which is a good exercise to recognize the origins of our family traditions and beliefs. Within this analysis are the three primary cultures of race, ethnicity, and nationality. These are the core elements of who we are that we inherited directly from our ancestors. There will likely be overlaps as very few of us can claim a single origin.

Sub-cultures are where we personally connect and are revealed by our involvement and degree of participation. Folkways bring these elements together and keep the folklore of the group alive into future generations. As you uncover the surviving fragments, many will experience “aha” moments and declare “That’s why they do what they do!”

As you work through the course material, you will discover which cultures have influenced your family and identify the elements that have survived and are being perpetuated to the next generations. You may be surprised by what is revealed. Demystifying Culture and Folklore takes you on a journey, one that you didn’t realize you were already on. Pieces begin to fit together to reveal how race, ethnicity and nationality are uniquely interwoven in your family.

Visit our website for a complete list of courses offered by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Demystifying Culture and Folklore: Intro

Every family historian begins their search with a few simple questions: Who were my ancestors? and… Where did they come from? Most of our first and second-generation answers are easily obtained from close family members – usually. However, our true story is far deeper than the basic facts of names, dates and locations. The complexity of our families cannot be defined in simple terms; we need to explore the inner dynamics and subtleties in the undercurrents of the inter-woven fabric of our family.

Culture and its accompanying behaviours, traditions, stories, etc. (Folklore) are an interesting and integral part of who we are as human beings. As we explore our roots, we are encouraged to begin to determine:

  • how has our primary cultures (race, ethnicity, nationality) influenced our ancestors over the generations; and,
  • how has our subcultures (religion, family, occupations, etc.) been formed and influenced by the intergenerational folklore passed down from our ancestors.

Looking more intently into our own lives and the lives of our forebears, we will discover unique family experiences, and uncover what has been hidden in plain sight. Unlike other research projects where official documents are accessed, and the basic facts are extracted and analyzed, examining the inner workings of our families – the things that have not been written down and perhaps never previously investigated, will stimulate the “why” questions for further study. These cause us to dig deeper in order to gain an understanding of the origins of our own folkways.

In the course Demystifying Culture and Folklore, each component will stimulate the need for deeper investigation and will prompt participants to pursue “the rest of the story” to verify what was revealed. The outcome will be a richer understanding of our family and the lives of our ancestors – Demystifying its unique Culture and the Folklore that has been passed down the generations.

Visit our website for a complete list of courses offered by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Student Lounge Bonus Sessions

We are once again opening our National Institute for Genealogical Studies Student Lounge this week for discussion. Please see below for the Pop-up session topics and times.

During your time spent in the Student Lounge, we ask that you PLEASE KEEP THE DISCUSSION ABOUT GENEALOGY AND THE ONLINE COURSES ONLY. We are all dealing with enough stress. This is a time to enjoy your family history, courses, and learn genealogy from others.
Gena Philibert-Ortega and/or Sue de Groot will be monitoring the Student Lounge during the scheduled hours and will be inactive as they still have work to do. As time permits in the workday, Gena or Sue may pop into the Virtual Learning Room to answer questions and give a small presentation.

Please join us in the Student Lounge at https://adobe.ly/39vDrLo. When signing in, select “Enter as a Guest” and enter your first name along with your geographical location.

The Student Lounge Bonus sessions schedule is as follows:
Tuesday, April 14th
Time zones: Eastern – 9 AM to 6 PM; Central – 8 AM to 5 PM; Mountain – 7 AM to 4 PM; Pacific – 6 AM to 3 PM; London, England – 2 PM to 11 PM; Sydney, Australia – 11 PM to 8 AM on Wednesday, April 15th

Wednesday, April 15th
Time zones: Eastern – 9 AM to 6 PM; Central – 8 AM to 5 PM; Mountain – 7 AM to 4 PM; Pacific – 6 AM to 3 PM; London, England – 2 PM to 11 PM; Sydney, Australia – 11 PM to 8 AM on Thursday, April 16th

Thursday, April 16th
Time zones: Eastern – 9 AM to 4:30 PM; Central – 8 AM to 3:30 PM; Mountain – 7 AM to 2:30 PM; Pacific – 6 AM to 1:30 PM; London, England – 2 PM to 9:30 PM; Sydney, Australia – 11 PM to 6:30 AM on Friday, April 17th

Pop-Up Session Topics:
Finding Images To Tell The Story of Your Ancestor’s Lives with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Tuesday, April 14th – Time zones: Eastern: 2 PM; Central: 1 PM; Mountain: Noon; Pacific: 11 AM; London, England: 7 PM; Wednesday, April 15th – Sydney, AU: 4 AM.

Transcribing … Basics with Sue de Groot
Wednesday, April 15th – Time zones: Eastern: 2 PM; Central: 1 PM; Mountain: Noon; Pacific: 11 AM; London, England: 7 PM; Thursday, April 16th – Sydney, AU: 4 AM

Finding Your Genealogy in Digitized Books with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Thursday, April 16th – Time zones: Eastern: 2 PM; Central: 1 PM; Mountain: Noon; Pacific: 11 AM; London, England: 7 PM; Friday, April 17th – Sydney, AU: 4 AM

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We hope to see you in the Student Lounge. And, please keep yourself and your family safe — follow the recommendations of your country’s government.
Happy Researching!

Note: Facebook Event here 

See complete list of Virtual Meetings here.

April Virtual Meetings

Our Monthly Virtual Meetings are a way for students and guests to communicate with the National Institute for Genealogical Studies’ instructors in a fun and interactive way and provides a place to ask questions about courses and/or research. These sessions are FREE and you do not have to be a current or past student to attend.

Attendees: NO USER NAME or PASSWORD REQUIRED. Please type in your first and last name, along with your geographic location; then click “Enter as a Guest” April Virtual Meetings

Thursday, April 16th – Australian Virtual Meeting with Kerry Farmer
Time zones – Eastern: 5 AM; Central: 4 AM; Mountain: 3 AM; Pacific: 2 AM; London, England: 10 AM; Sydney, Australia: 7 PM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/australian/

Saturday, April 18th – Canadian Virtual Meeting with Cheryl Levy
Time zones – Eastern: 10 AM; Central: 9 AM; Mountain: 8 AM; Pacific: 7 AM; London, England: 3 PM; Sunday, April 19th – Sydney, Australia: Midnight.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/canadian/

Tuesday, April 21st – Methodology Virtual Meeting with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: – Eastern: 2:30 PM; Central: 1:30 PM; Mountain: 12:30 PM; Pacific: 11:30 AM; London, England: 7:30 PM; Wednesday, April 22nd – Sydney, Australia: 4:30 AM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/

Tuesday, April 21st – Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program-Part 3 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: – Eastern: 4 PM; Central: 3 PM; Mountain: 2 PM; Pacific: 1 PM; London, England: 9 PM; Wednesday, April 22nd – Sydney, Australia: 6 AM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle3/

Wednesday, April 22nd – STUDENT LOUNGE 
Time zones – Eastern: 10 AM; Central: 9 AM; Mountain: 8 AM; Pacific: 7 AM; London, England: 3 PM; Thursday, April 23rd – Sydney, Australia: Midnight.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/lounge/

Wednesday, April 22nd – American Virtual Meeting with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones – Eastern: 1 PM; Central: Noon; Mountain: 11 AM; Pacific: 10 AM; London, England: 6 PM; Thursday, April 23rd – Sydney, Australia: 3 AM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/

Wednesday, April 22nd – Internet Tools Virtual Meeting with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones: – Eastern: 2:30 PM; Central: 1:30 PM; Mountain: 12:30 PM; Pacific: 11:30 AM; London, England: 7:30 PM; Thursday, April 23rd – Sydney, Australia: 4:30 AM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/internettools/

Saturday, April 25th – Analysis & Skills Mentoring Program – GENERAL with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones – Eastern: 10 AM; Central: 9 AM; Mountain: 8 AM; Pacific: 7 AM; London, England: 3 PM; Sunday, April 26th – Sydney, Australia: Midnight.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asgeneral/

Sunday, April 26th – English Virtual Meeting with Brenda Wheeler
Time zones – Eastern: 8 PM; Central: 7 PM; Mountain: 6 PM; Pacific: 5 PM; Monday, April 27th – London, England: 1 AM; Sydney, Australia: 10 AM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/english/

Monday, April 27thMethodology Virtual Meeting with Brenda Wheeler
Time zones – Eastern: 5 AM; Central: 4 AM; Mountain: 3 AM; Pacific: 2 AM; London, England: 10 AM; Sydney, Australia: 7 PM.
MEETING LOCATION:
https://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/ 

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Calendar of Virtual Meetings is at www.genealogicalstudies.com;
Read the Instructions at www.genealogicalstudies.com/instructions.pdf.

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