The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Diocese and Archdiocese in Italian Records

Every country-specific certificate program at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies includes courses for Religious Records.

As we research our ancestors and their family members, we will undoubtedly be faced with the challenge of locating their religious records within the communities where they spent their lives. In small rural areas, it may be easy as we locate the only village parish. However, it is not always as simple as we may think.

As we continue in the course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1, our next task will be to Understand Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions & Archives and how to access the Parish records in local archives. Let’s dig a little deeper.

Diocese & Archdiocese

Diocese, spelled the same in Italian and English, is a group of parishes within a particular ecclesiastical district. Each diocese has a diocesan archive, usually named Archivio Diocesano or Archivio Storico Diocesano.

An archdiocese is a group of dioceses within a particular region (regione ecclesiastica). Some larger cities may contain the seat of the archdiocese as well as one of the dioceses within their jurisdiction. In these cases, the main offices are usually combined and the Archivio Diocesano located in the same building. These archives are usually quite organized, but their hours of operation are few. Often there is only one archivist who is also a priest with all the duties that come with that position.

Many diocesan archives will have their own websites containing contact information, hours, and descriptions about their collection. Research in the diocese archive is usually by appointment only so please be sure to write ahead for permission several weeks in advance before leaving for Italy on a research trip. Additionally, you should verify that they have the type of records you seek. An archive’s contents, what records have survived, and the procedure to access the records can vary widely. It is advisable to leave at least 50 euros as a donation after being allowed to access these records.

Some diocesan archives have the parish records for all the parishes within their jurisdiction prior to 1900. Other dioceses have records conserved in each individual parish.

The types of records usually found in a diocesan archive may include:

  • Marriage supplements (which may contain a dispensation)
  • Baptismal and Marriage records after 1900 (second copy)
  • Records of Closed Parishes
  • Service Records for Priests and Nuns
  • The State of the Souls Records (stato delle anime)

These records will be invaluable to your Italian research.

Are you researching your Italian Catholic ancestors? Our course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1 can help you to discover part of their stories through the records they left behind. Check the Course Calendar for the next time this course will be offered.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Understanding Latin in Italian Records

Every country-specific certificate program at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies includes courses for Religious Records. In many cases, the religious beliefs of our ancestors became a vital part of their family story. We explore the records of baptisms, marriages and burials, along with other religious ceremonies relating to their beliefs and customs, to discover information not found in the civil records.

In the course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1, we will examine these records, but one of the first challenges may be language. A useful resource is the Italian Genealogical Word List for translating Italian to English. However, Latin may be a bigger challenge. Here are some tips.

A Lesson in Latin: Understanding the Italian Records

Latin is an inflected language in which all verbs are conjugated, and all the nouns and adjectives use different cases. This means that words have different endings according to the function they play in a sentence, so it really does not matter in what order the words in a sentence are presented. This is different than the English language.

Names and words can be seen in the normative, genitive, ablative, and accusative forms. These are defined as:

  • “Nominative (nominativus): Subject of the sentence.
  • Genitive (genitivus): Generally translated by the English possessive, or by the objective with the preposition of.
  • Accusative (accusativus): Direct object of the verb and object with many prepositions.
  • Ablative (ablativus): Used to show means, manner, place, and other circumstances. Usually translated by the objective with the prepositions “from, by, with, in, at.””[1]

Some examples include:

Nominative Genitive (of) ex + Ablative (from) Accusative Italian
Antoni-us Antoni-i ex Antoni-o Antoni-um Antonio
Joseph-us Joseph-i ex Joseph-o Joseph-um Giuseppe
Anna-a Ann-ae ex Ann-a Ann-am Anna
Joann-es Joann-is ex Joan-e Joann-em Giovanni

Recurrent words have different endings:

Nominative Genitive Accusative English
Fili-us Fili-i Fili-um Son
Fili-a Fili-ae Fili-am Daughter
Infans Infant-is Infant-em Infant

Months are often abbreviated:

English Latin Abbreviation(s)
September septembris 7ber, 7bris, VIIber, VIIbris
October octobris 8ber, 8bris, VIIIber, VIIIbris
November Novembris 9ber, 9bris, IXber, IXbris
December Decembris 10ber, 10bris, Xber, Xbris

Are you researching your Italian Catholic ancestors? Our course Italian: Catholic Church Records-Part 1 can help you to discover part of their stories through the records they left behind. Check the Course Calendar for the next time this course will be offered.

[1] “The 6 Cases of Latin Nouns,” ThoughtCo. (https://www.thoughtco.com/cases-of-latin-nouns-117588 : accessed 16 September 2019).

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

 

New Year ~ New Goals

Happy New Year 2021! The holiday celebrations are coming to a close and most schedules are returning to a more regular routine. Hopefully, you were able to complete your 2020 projects. Perhaps you were fortunate enough to have opportunity to interview family members, or break through one of your break walls in 2020. Don’t forget to record any family stories you were able to discover over this holiday season, as well as recording your own 2020 memories. It certainly was a year to remember!

Now it is time to get ready for new genealogical opportunities for 2021! What will you discover? Instead of making “New Year’s Resolutions” that may or may not be attainable, make Realistic Genealogical Goals that will benefit your research, both in the short term, and with long lasting rewards. To begin, what do you want to accomplish? Make a plan! Do you need to get your files and documents organized? Implement a system that works for you. Have you lost where you left off in your research? Review the notes for your findings and make a proper research plan. Forgot where you found that information? Be sure to cite your sources! Review your work and make sure you will be able to find that source again. At a time when many repositories are closed to in-person visits, work on what you can achieve at home. Make a list of what has been left undone and needs follow-up. Then set your goals for how you will complete each research project. You have a brand-new open calendar before you, plan your time wisely.

Do you have education goals for 2021? Make a list of topics you want to pursue. How can you accomplish this goal? Is there a new book to read on the topic? Are there webinars to watch? Does the topic require more in-depth study? Is online education on your list of goals for 2021?

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers quality online education with over 230+ courses to choose from. Some of our courses are topic/country-specific, or provide insight into research methodology, while others are skill-building courses to maximize your research time. The first Monday of a new month means another rotation of courses will start on January 4th. You can still join the class until this Friday. Most courses feature 6 modules over an 8-week period, easily adapted to most busy schedules. Many courses have been bundled into packages to provide discount options. Take a look and see which courses will accomplish your 2021 education goals and register today!

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com 

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

 

Grandmothers, Mothers, and Daughters

Our female ancestors played significant roles in history. Yet, researching and writing about the women in our families can be a daunting task. If you have hit a brick wall in the quest to find information about your female ancestors, consider registering for our Research: Grandmothers, Mothers & Daughters – Tracing Women course, which is just one of the online genealogy courses from The National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

This course is designed to guide you through the process of researching your family’s history by covering strategies and key sources you will need to access in order to overcome common challenges when tracing female ancestors. It will show you how to document “her” story and reveal the often-hidden aspects of their lives.

The untold journey of our Grandmothers, Mothers & Daughters needs to be told and should not remain silenced any longer.

Check out course highlights in the following blog posts:
Part 1: Researching HER Story
Part 2: What’s in a Name?
Part 3: Digging Deeper into HER Story
Part 4: Timelines for the Ladies in our Tree

The Research: Grandmothers, Mothers & Daughters – Tracing Women course description can be found here.

Check the Course Calendar schedule below to find the next start date for this course and register today!

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

 

Genealogy in a Package

What’s on Your 2021 Wish List?

Tis the season for packages! We all love to receive them and to open them. However, some package contents are better than others. We have made our genealogy wish lists and dropped several hints, but what will we receive? Slippers and socks are fun (usually), but how much better if your package was genealogy-related? The National Institute for Genealogical Studies can make sure your package has just the right courses for your 2021 genealogy education plan.

You can choose any of our 230+ courses individually, or one of our specific Course Packages listed below, but did you know that you can also create your own unique package? Choose 4, 7, 8, 10 or 13 courses and make your package with the exact courses needed for your own distinctive research project. See details for all Course Packages here.

Special Genealogy Course Packages

DNA Packages
These packages include courses relevant to your understanding of DNA and how it can be used in your genealogical research.
DNA and Relevant Topics: 8 Courses
DNA – Understanding Testing and Research Strategies: 4 Courses

Skill-Building Package
The four courses included in this package will help you expand your research skills.
Genealogy Ethical Guidelines & Standards
Skill-Building: Breaking Down Brick Walls
Skill-Building: Evidence Analysis and Evaluation Using Case Studies
Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting Research

Business Skills Package
This package includes all the courses needed to give students a good understanding of how to start and manage a genealogical business, and what niche business opportunities are available to genealogists.
Business Skills Package: 18 Courses

Professional Learning Certificates

At the heart of The National Institute for Genealogical Studies online education is our Certificate in Genealogical Studies Program. Each certificate includes the study of specific topics and record groups relevant to certification. For all certificates, students are required to complete 40 courses, which includes specific compulsory courses and a choice of electives.

The Methodology Certificate is at the core of all of the certificates.

The exception is the Librarianship Certificate, which includes only 12 courses. There is an option to combine the Librarianship Certificate with a country-specific certificate as the elective portion.

The Professional Development Certificate program will benefit those who wish to pursue a career in genealogy, create a genealogy business or to augment their income potential by adding niche areas to their business plan. Skill-building courses are of high importance in this certificate to ensure quality results as a professional researcher.

American Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Australian Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Canadian Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Eastern European Certificate in Genealogical Studies

English Certificate in Genealogical Studies
German Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Irish Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Italian Certificate in Genealogical Studies
Scottish Certificate in Genealogical Studies

Packages for Specific Countries

If you are interested in just a few of the country-specific courses, but not a full certificate, you can choose a smaller All Countries Package of courses for the country of your choice, or a package for the records for these countries.
American Records Packages
Australian Records Packages
Canadian Records Packages
Eastern European Records Packages
English Records Packages
German Records Packages
Irish Records Packages
Italian Records Packages
Scottish Records Packages

Lastly, be sure to check the Complete List of Courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies, as there are several courses not included in the descriptions above that are eligible for packages. We hope that you will find the perfect package for your Genealogy Wish List… to sharpen your research skills, complete your family history projects, and accomplish your 2021 Genealogy Research Goals.

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
Email: admin@GenealogicalStudies.com
Website: www.GenealogicalStudies.com
Blog: blog.GenealogicalStudies.com

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

Keeping in Touch

Keeping in Touch…

Communication is so important in genealogy in order to keep abreast of constantly evolving information. The same is true within The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. As a student of The National Institute, there are various ways you can communicate with us and your fellow students (see below).

We want all of our students to enjoy their learning experience. Please do not worry or fret over your courses by yourself. We are here to help you!

**** NOTE: Our social media accounts are NOT monitored regularly. If you need an answer quickly, please do the old-fashion thing, pick up the phone. We can be reached at 1-800-580-0165, ext. #1 (North America) or 416-861-0165. Please leave a message if no one answers.

#1 By email to The National Institute

**** NOTE: When contacting us please INCLUDE your FIRST & LAST NAME and the COURSE TITLE including the COUNTRY, if a records course. It is also helpful if you include the module number and section title you are referring to. ****

i) admin@genealogicalstudies.com –  for general questions;

ii) alert@genealogicalstudies.com – to advise us of broken links in your course materials and assignments–please be specific as to where problem is;

iii) exam@genealogicalstudies.com – questions pertaining to your course
exam.

#2 By email to a fellow student

When you view a fellow student’s public assignment SUBMISSION/ANSWER and you would like to contact them about something in their posting, simply click on the envelope icon to the right of the student’s name. A new window will open where you can type your message. For privacy reasons, you will not see the recipient’s email address and they have the option to reply or not.

#3 Attend a Virtual Meeting

VIRTUAL MEETINGS ARE THE BEST PLACE TO COMMUNICATE with an instructor and fellow students. Anyone can participate! You do not have to be registered in the course to attend. When attending virtual meetings, please bring questions applicable to the topic being discussed.

Watch for our emails outlining upcoming virtual meetings dates and times. Or visit our website at www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Virtual Learning Room for the full schedule.

#4 Follow The National Institute’s Blog

Go to http://blog.genealogicalstudies.com/ and scroll down. On the right hand side of the page you will see Subscribe to Blog via Email. In the text box, enter your email address and click on the Subscribe button. Once subscribed, you will receive an email each time we post an article. Each blog article includes a link to write a comment or share via social media. Look for these options at the end of each blog post.

#5 Follow us on Twitter

Once signed into your Twitter account, search for us on Twitter by our Twitter name @GeneaStudies. On our Twitter page, click on the Follow button to subscribe to our tweets. Not a member of Twitter? No problem, just go to Twitter www.twitter.com and join. Membership is free.

#6 Follow The National Institute on Facebook

To follow us on Facebook you must be a member. To join Facebook go to www.facebook.com and sign up. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/geneastudies. Click on the Like button on the top right of our page.

#7 Follow us on Pinterest

To follow us on Pinterest you must be a member. To join Pinterest go to
www.pinterest.ca and sign up. Find us on Pinterest at www.pinterest.ca/GeneaStudies/boards/. Click on the Follow button to view our various boards.

#8 Join a GenealogyWise group to communicate with your fellow students

Go to www.genealogywise.com/ and Sign Up. There are groups set up for each of The National Institute’s country streams; i.e. American, Australian, Canadian, Eastern European, English, German, Italian, Irish, and Scottish, as well as Methodology, DNA, Librarianship, Alumni, and First Timer FAQs.

#9 Follow GenealogyWise on Facebook

To follow us on Facebook you must be a member. To join Facebook go to
www.facebook.com and sign up. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GenealogyWise and click on the Like button on the top right of our page.

#10 Follow GenealogyWise on Twitter

Once signed into your Twitter account, search for GenealogyWise on Twitter by our Twitter name @GenealogyWise. On our Twitter page, click on the Follow button to subscribe to our tweets. Not a member of Twitter? No problem, just go to Twitter www.twitter.com and join. Membership is free.

#11 Consultation with an instructor ($)

If you want to have a one-on-one consultation with an instructor this can be arranged. Please email admin@genealogicalstudies.com to request an appointment. When emailing please provide some information as to what course and some background details you would like to discuss so we can recommend a consultation with an appropriate instructor. The consultation with an instructor is available for a modest fee.

#12 Join your fellow students in the STUDENT LOUNGE Virtual Meeting

We have made a Virtual Meeting room available to our students once a month. Pop into the “Student Lounge” for a genealogy coffee break and talk family history with your fellow students. The time is yours to chat, ask questions, or just listen.

Watch for our emails outlining upcoming virtual meetings dates and times. Or visit our website at www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Virtual Learning Room for the full schedule.

Good luck with your studies and research!

Sincerely,

Sue de Groot, PLCGS
National Institute for Genealogical Studies

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Note: This message is for students and subscribers at The National Institute for Genealogical Studies, leaders in genealogy education since 1997.

To Subscribe, send an email to admin@genealogicalstudies.com.

For more information on the over 230 courses, we offer our students, visit https://www.genealogicalstudies.com/eng/courses.asp

December Memories

Ready or not, December is upon us. Many people are happy to see the end of 2020 coming! It has definitely been a challenging year for many. At the National Institute, we have been continuing to offer quality online education with over 230 courses to choose from. The first Monday of the month means another rotation of courses will be starting on December 7th.

December is also a time for Remembering Family Traditions. The Holidays are filled with a combination of memories of past celebrations and opportunities to create new ones. Our 2020 holiday plans will certainly be different than in past years, but perhaps, it is a unique opportunity to really examine our usual traditions and explore how they established their place in our own family. How have they changed from one generation to the next? Have you shared your holiday memories with younger generations? Have you asked the older generations about their childhood traditions and memories? This is the perfect time to initiate those conversations. The bonus is – if you do this in a virtual format, you will have the opportunity to record their memories in their own voices. What a precious family keepsake!

It is a time for Preserving Family Origins. Many holiday traditions originate from our countries of origin. Watch for traditional holiday foods made only for this time of year. Special family recipes are pulled out and prepared with love. Grandma’s recipe carries on the family tradition, but it carries memories with it as well, not only for the tastes and smells, but also of the person who prepared it many years ago. They are not forgotten, especially when sharing with younger generations, so they know why we continue the tradition.

Share those stories. Record those stories. Document their origins. Search out how they became your family’s tradition. You may discover parts of the story you have forgotten, but when a sibling or a cousin relays their memory and “the rest of the story” may be revealed. Look at photographs of past celebrations. So many stories are triggered by old photos, sparking memories and reminiscing with family members. These times are so important and pull the generations together.

Investigate how your ancestors celebrated the holidays in their time, especially the immigrant ancestors. How was it different “in the old country”? Did they bring traditions with them, or did they embrace new traditions? Most families are a blend of old and new, evolving with each generation. Learn all you can and be the one to preserve your family’s stories.

Are you looking for online courses to help you in your research? Be sure to include some topics that dig into your ancestors’ lives beyond the official documents. Preserve their traditions and stories for their descendants, and for future generations.
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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

Deadline Extension

The National Institute has had an early visit from Santa Claus! Santa has given each student an extension on their course which has a course completion date between December 13th to January 10th. Your new course completion date is January 17, 2021!

Wow! What a year 2020 has been. Who would have thought we would be living through history … are you writing about this past year and your day-to-day life to pass on to your descendants?

Some of you may be thinking about New Year’s resolutions and course studies may be on your list of resolutions. We have a tool to help you stay organized and on track with your studies … a Course Study Plan. To download a PDF copy of the Course Study Plan, go to www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Forms in the dropdown menu. You will find the Course Study Plan at the top of the list of forms.

For students who are working on the Analysis & Skills Mentoring and Lecturing Skills courses, you will find a course specific Course Study Plan in the online course details. In your Student Briefcase, enter the course and go to the Documents tab. You will find the Course Study Plan under the Useful Forms section.

May you and your loved ones have a safe and happy holiday.

Best wishes for 2021!

From the Staff and Faculty
at the National Institute for Genealogical Studies
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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

Presentations Come and Go, but You Always Remember Your First

One of the truly valuable courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies is our Lecturing Skills Including Preparation course. This course focuses on the skills needed to present genealogical-related lectures to a variety of audiences. It is a “hands on” course where the student will develop all aspects of the lecturing process including the proposal and biographical sketch; marketing; syllabus material; creating lecture slides; and much more. Linda Debe is one of our most recent students who has completed this course, and she shares her experience below.

Presentations Come and Go, but You Always Remember Your First
by Linda Debe, Student 

On Saturday, Nov 14, 2020, I presented my first official webinar to fellow students, colleagues, friends, and family. This presentation was part of the National Institute’s course: Lecturing Skills Including Preparation.

First, I had to decide on a lecture topic. I started my list, but none of the topics really gave me that warm fuzzy feeling. Adding to the topic dilemma, I only had 30 minutes to present, so it had to be interesting yet explained in the allotted time.

A friend suggested, “Talk about what you love… maps.” With that, I decided to do an introductory presentation on Google My Maps. I have watched many presentations explaining Google Earth Pro, but not as many on My Maps.

Once I had the presentation topic, I needed to decide on a title. I decided on “Google My Maps: Visualizing Your Ancestors’ Lives.”  It was to the point, yet kind of catchy.

I have used Google My Maps for about a year, and I really like “seeing” my ancestors on a map as I track them from their origins and immigration into the United States to their migration across the country as they lived their lives. I can add photos of my ancestors, their homes, tombstones, or any other photo I have, to that location, to help bring it to life. For example, it’s great to find your family in the 1880 US Census, but what if you added that census record to a pin in the exact location the family lived on your map?  How cool would that be?

Another nice thing about this app is you can color code your pins (places on your map). You can even change the pin icon, so it’s not the boring default balloon pin, but maybe a house, cow, hospital, castle, or piece of pizza.

With Google My Maps you can build layers, which are groupings of pins, in a way that makes sense to you. Group the pins by a family name, a state, paternal or maternal line, or a layer with all of the locations where a veteran served. Imagine the difference in just knowing your dad served in Viet Nam, then getting his military records so you can plot out on a map the actual locations where he was stationed.

With Google Maps, you can share and collaborate your maps with family, friends, and other genealogists. Because the maps are saved to Google Drive, you can share your map with a few clicks, so others can see and appreciate your work.

Now at Thanksgiving dinner, or any other family gathering, rather than the eye rolls or the glassy-eyed stare you get when you bring up the topic of genealogy, hook up the laptop to the big screen TV and show your map to the family. You will have a captive audience and everyone will want a front-row seat.  With Google My Maps, family history ceases to be just a bunch of dull dates, places, and documents and instead can be “seen.”

More information about the Lecturing Skills Including Preparation Course is available here. 

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
blog.GenealogicalStudies.com
admin@GenealogicalStudies.com

DNA Research Courses

DNA is currently a very popular topic. With the Holiday season comes sales and  discounts offered for many of the DNA testing kits. They make great gifts any time of the year! Many of our readers have already submitted their DNA tests to a variety of testing companies and have experienced the excitement of discovering their genetic roots.

Once you have received your DNA results, and shared your ethnicity percentages, now what? How do you make sense of your DNA results and analyze what that means for you and your genealogy research? There are many resources available. First, make sure to read ALL of the information provided by your DNA testing organization.

The BCG Genealogy Standards Second Edition is one resource that is strongly recommended to explore. Use their genealogy standards and guidelines when dealing with the DNA results that you have revealed and how to manage them. You can purchase a copy through our Genealogy Store.

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies offers two specific DNA packages, as well as additional courses relating to DNA and genetics available to be taken individually. If you are interested in increasing your understanding of DNA, or want to learn ways to analyze your data, or learn how to implement strategies to organize your matches, please check out the following course descriptions more closely. Note: Registration fees and start dates are available under the Register tab for each course.

DNA – Understanding DNA Testing and Research Strategies
DNA: 4 Course Package
DNA: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy (BASIC)
DNA: Autosomal DNA – Testing for Everyone (BASIC)
DNA: Tracing Maternal & Paternal Lines (BASIC)
DNA: Special Circumstances – Adoptees & Unknown Parentage (ADVANCED)

DNA and Relevant Topics
DNA: 8 Course Package (The above 4 courses plus 4 more courses)
Forensic Genealogy (INTERMEDIATE)
Organizing a One-Name Study (INTERMEDIATE)
Organizing a One-Place Study (INTERMEDIATE)
Genealogy Ethical Guidelines & Standards (ADVANCED)

Additional Courses with DNA elements
Research: U.S. 20th Century Records, Including Adoption Records (INTERMEDIATE)
Research: U.S. Records Using Ancestry including DNA Strategies (INTERMEDIATE)
Genetics & Medical Family History (ADVANCED)

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies also offers free monthly Virtual Meetings for our students and those who are interested in discussing DNA research. Check the calendar below for dates and times. You do not have to be registered for a course in order to attend our monthly virtual meetings.

Finally, the best advice is to learn all that you can about DNA testing and analysis. Read DNA materials, watch DNA webinars, attend DNA workshops, and take DNA classes. No matter the level of your understanding, there will always be more to learn… and more to discover! Review our DNA courses listed in this blog post and see if there is an appropriate course to assist you in your DNA research projects. Then register for the course or package of courses of your choice by using the links provided below. Happy DNA searching!

Virtual Meetings Calendar
Course Calendar
Complete List of Courses
Complete List of Packages
List of Certificate Programs

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Visit our website for a complete list of online courses offered by The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Check our Course Calendar here.
Follow us on Social Media: BlogFacebookTwitter, Pinterest.
*Note: Please be aware our social media accounts are monitored regularly, but NOT 24/7. If you have any questions, please contact the office directly.

Contact information:
1 (800) 580-0165
www.GenealogicalStudies.com
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