The National Institute for Genealogical Studies

LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies - LEADERS IN ONLINE GENEALOGY EDUCATION

July 2018 Virtual Meetings

Month by arztsamui/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

Have questions about your courses or your research? Virtual Meetings are a great way  to communicate with an instructor. Mark your calendars and join us for the following meetings!

Tuesday, July 10th at 10:00 AM EDT – Methodology courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This session is appropriate for ALL students no matter which country you are researching in.
Time zones:
Tuesday, July 10th – 10:00 AM Eastern; 9:00 AM Central; 7:00 AM Pacific; 3:00 PM in London, England; Wednesday, July 11th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Tuesday, July 10th at 11:30 AM EDT – Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program-Part 1 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This session is appropriate for students registered in this course.
Time zones:
Tuesday, July 10th – 11:30 AM Eastern; 10:30 AM Central; 8:30 AM Pacific; 4:30 PM in London, England; Wednesday, July 11th – 1:30 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle1/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Wednesday, July 11th at 10:00 AM EDT – Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program – GENERAL with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This session is appropriate for students registered in the Analysis and Skills Mentoring courses.
Time zones:
Wednesday, July 11th – 10:00 AM Eastern; 9:00 AM Central; 7:00 AM Pacific; 3:00 PM in London, England; Thursday, July 12th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asgeneral/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Wednesday, July 11th at 11:30 AM EDT – Internet Tools with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This session is appropriate for students registered in/working on the Connecting Family: Online and Virtually, Google for the Wise Genealogist, and Social Media Tools for the Wise Genealogist courses.
Time zones:
Wednesday, July 11th – 11:30 AM Eastern; 10:30 AM Central; 8:30 AM Pacific; 4:30 PM in London, England; Thursday, July 12th – 1:30 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/internettools/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Wednesday, July 11th at 1:00 PM EDT – American Records courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega
Time zones:
Wednesday, July 11th – 1:00 PM Eastern; Noon Central; 10:00 AM Pacific; 6:00 PM in London, England; Thursday, July 12th – 3:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

 

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Tuesday, July 17th at 5:00 AM EDT – Australian Record courses with Kerry Farmer
Time zones:
Tuesday, July 17th – 5:00 AM Eastern; 4:00 AM Central; 2:00 AM Pacific; 10:00 AM in London, England; 7:00 PM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/australian/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Thursday, July 19th at 5:00 PM EDT – English Record courses with Brenda Wheeler
Time zones:
Thursday, July 19th – 5:00 PM Eastern; 4:00 PM Central; 2:00 PM Pacific; 10:00 PM in London, England; Friday, July 20th – 7:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/english/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Friday, July 20th at 8:00 PM EDT – Methodology courses with Brenda Wheeler
This session is appropriate for ALL students no matter which country you are researching in. Note: This Virtual Meeting is available for the convenience of our Australasia students; however, everyone is welcome.
Time zones:
Friday, July 20th – 8:00 PM Eastern; 7:00 PM Central; 5:00 PM Pacific; Saturday, July 21st – 1:00 AM in London, England; 10:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Saturday, July 21st at 11:00 AM EDT – Canadian courses with Kathryn Lake Hogan
Time zones:
Saturday, July 14th – 11:00 AM Eastern; 10:00 AM Central; 8:00 AM Pacific; 4:00 PM in London, England; Sunday, July 15th – 1:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/canadian/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Sunday, July 22nd at 7:00 PM EDT – Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program-Part 3 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Brenda Wheeler
This session is appropriate for students registered in this course.
Time zones:
Sunday, July 22nd – 7:00 PM Eastern; 6:00 PM Central; 4:00 PM Pacific; Monday, July 23rd – Midnight in London, England; 9:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle3/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Sunday, July 29th at 7:00 PM EDT – Professional Development with Gena Philibert-Ortega
This session is appropriate for students registered in this program. Discussions will be at the advanced level.
Time zones:
Sunday, July 29th – 7:00 PM Eastern; 6:00 PM Central; 4:00 PM Pacific; Monday, July 30th – Midnight in London, England; 9:00 AM in Sydney, Australia
MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/professional/ (Note: “Enter as a Guest”)

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Calendar of Virtual Meetings is at www.genealogicalstudies.com; top menu > INFORMATION > VIRTUAL LEARNING ROOM.

If you have not attended a Virtual Meeting before, read the Instructions at www.genealogicalstudies.com/instructions.pdf.

Your German Migrant Ancestor

Pens at Ellis Island, Main Hall. New York Public Library. Flickr the Commons. https://flic.kr/p/5JQnbj

 

By Jean Wilcox Hibben, PhD.

If your ancestor was an auswanderer – one who left the area now called Germany – with a group of other like-minded individuals, he/she was an emigrant and might be found in any number of locations.

You are probably already familiar with the phenomenon of “push-pull” when it comes to emigration/immigration. North America was hardly the only option for those seeking a better life. For some, it was a “stop along the way,” giving them a chance to perhaps make some money or reunite with family before traveling on to Canada and Nova Scotia, South and Central America, the West Indies, Asia, and even Africa. All of which eventually had German settlements. Possibly, after coming to North America, some of your ancestors elected to return to one of the ports of call along the way on their initial trip. But, of course, large numbers of German immigrants populated the big cities in Pennsylvania, New York, Illinois, Wisconsin, etc. And full colonies of Germans began to populate the Southern states, such as the Carolinas and Georgia, and throughout the Appalachian territory.[1]

In 1822, a German encyclopedia explained German emigration as follows (giving us a perspective of how this phenomenon was viewed in the first quarter of the 19th Century):

It was not overpopulation alone which was the essential cause of emigration, but rather the hopelessness that conditions would ever improve, the fear that still more adversity was approaching, and the total lack of trust in the government to provide any relief.[2]

In the approximately 40 years between the 1840s and 1880s, four million Germans emigrated to America and between the 1880s and the 1920s, another four million Austro-Hungarians joined them. The former group was fleeing recession and political unrest while the latter group departed to remove themselves from poverty and oppression. [3] So between the 1840s and the first quarter of the 20th century, Germans, or those from that general area of the world, contributed the largest number of immigrants to the American economy, workforce, and military.

For researchers in North America, there is a tendency to focus on Germans who settled in specific communities in most of the earliest states as well as the ones who gravitated towards the west, many making up some of the first residents in the most western territories and states. But Germans emigrated to other locations as well and your family research may need to include some of these places to find correlating lines, the location of departure for your North American German immigrants, or even living cousins who can provide needed family information. Unfortunately, passenger departure lists have not survived as well as the lists of arriving passengers in the port of disembarkation. Hamburg has the most complete departure lists, but, many found less strict port departures, such as LeHavre, to be preferable when leaving German communities. Many traveled a great distance to avoid the “red tape” involved in emigration, leaving from locations as far away as the Netherlands (Rotterdam) and Denmark (Copenhagen).[4] If you are fortunate enough to have found your ancestor on a passenger list as an immigrant, that document should identify the port from which the ship sailed, giving you a possibility of finding your ancestor listed on a departure list, if it survived. Keep in mind that as more people departed their home country, the information on the lists, as well as the requirements for emigration, became more detailed and strict.[5]

So when did the emigrants leave? Certain events caused the exodus to occur more heavily in some time periods than in others. To understand the timeline, it helps to understand those events:

  • From 1683 to 1820: destinations were North America, England, Scotland, Ireland, Southeastern Europe, and Russia. Following the Thirty Years’ War, Germans were affected by both religious persecution and economic stress making departure look like a better alternative.[6]
  • From 1820 to 1871: destinations varied and were caused by the continued economic issues as well as agricultural and occupational hardships. The government supported the exodus, especially by the poorer class, even though many left to evade military conscription.[7]
  • From 1871 to 1914: destinations varied. The German Empire had been formed and even more of the population evacuated, especially since the process of traveling to other countries had become less costly, even though the requirements to get permission to leave were more stringent (specifically in Hamburg).[8] Likely, communication from family and friends who had already made the journey enticed those who were feeling the financial stress “at home.”
  • From 1914 to 1945: in North America because of the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924 (limiting the influx of immigrants, including Europeans) into America, numbers were reduced.[9] While this did not have an immediate effect on immigration in other countries, it did change the destinations of many Germans. The desire was to escape the political situation and for those concerned about World War I many sought asylum in neutral or more politically favorable countries.[10]

 

**Excerpted from the course Germans Outside of Germany by Jean Wilcox Hibben, PhD.

[1] Marianne S. Wokeck, Trade in Strangers: The Beginnings of Mass Migration to North America, University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State Univ. Press, 1999, pp. 221-230.

[2] Allgemeinen Deutschen Real-Encyclopädie, as quoted in Sigrid Kiedel, Bremerhaven: Die Stadt am Meer, Edition Temmen, 1999 and reprinted in “Mischmasch,” Der Blumenbaum 20:4, April-May-June, 2003, p. 186.

[3] Richard L. Hooverson, “Musings and Gleanings,” Heritage Quest, May/June 2001, quoted in “America’s Melting Pot,” Der Blumenbaum, 20:4, April-May-June, 2003, p. 158

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] “Immigration Act of 1924,” Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigration_Act_of_1924: accessed 6 June 2017).

[10] “Germany Emigration and Immigration,” FamilySearch Family History Research Wiki (https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Germany_Emigration_and_Immigration: accessed 6 June 2017).

June Virtual Meetings

“Month” by arztsamui/Courtesy of Freedigitalphotos.net

We hope you are enjoying your courses! Have any questions about your courses or your research? Attend a virtual meeting applicable to your course/research to get answers. Below is the virtual meetings schedule for the month of June.

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Times given are Eastern Daylight Time.

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Saturday, June 9th at 10:00 AM EDT – All Methodology courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega

This Virtual Meeting is appropriate for ALL students no matter which country you are researching in. Join this session to ask questions or to discuss organizing, skill-building, strategies, effective searching and recording, proving it, transcribing, abstracting, extracting, copyright, and much more.

Time zones:

Saturday, June 9th – 10:00 AM Eastern; 9:00 AM Central; 7:00 AM Pacific; 3:00 PM in London, England;

Sunday, June 10th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Saturday, June 9th at 11:30 AM EDT – All Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program – GENERAL with Gena Philibert-Ortega

This Virtual Meeting is appropriate for students registered in the Analysis and Skills Mentoring courses. Students registered in the Skills: Transcribing, Abstracting, Extracting, Skill-Building: Breaking Down Brick Walls, Skill-Building: Evidence Analysis, and Skill-Building: Nuts & Bolts of Reporting are also welcome to join. Topics for discussion include course procedure, evidence analysis, Genealogical Proof Standard (GPS), citations, ethics, timelines, transcriptions, abstractions, extractions, proof summaries and more.

Time zones:

Saturday, June 9th – 11:30 AM Eastern; 10:30 AM Central; 8:30 AM Pacific; 4:30 PM in London, England;

Sunday, June 10th – 1:30 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asgeneral/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Sunday, June 10th at 7:00 PM EDT – Internet Tools with Gena Philibert-Ortega

This session is appropriate for students registered in/working on the Connecting Family: Online and Virtually, Google for the Wise Genealogist, and Social Media Tools for the Wise Genealogist courses, although all are welcome. Join Gena to ask questions about these courses and/or your Internet searches.

Time zones:

Sunday, June 10th – 7:00 PM Eastern; 6:00 PM Central; 4:00 PM Pacific;

Monday, June 11th – Midnight in London, England; 9:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/internettools/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Sunday, June 10th at 8:30 PM EDT – All American courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega

Join Gena to ask questions about the American record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Sunday, June 10th – 8:30 PM Eastern; 7:30 PM Central; 5:30 PM Pacific;

Monday, June 11th – 1:30 AM in London, England; 10:30 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Tuesday, June 12th at 10:00 AM EDT – All Canadian courses with Kathryn Lake Hogan

Join Kathryn to ask questions about the Canadian record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Tuesday, June 12th – 10:00 AM Eastern; 9:00 AM Central; 7:00 AM Pacific; 3:00 PM in London, England;

Wednesday, June 13th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/canadian/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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LISTEN ON THE GO!

Want to listen to the student presentation but will not be at your computer? No problem! You can download the FREE Adobe Connect Mobile App from the iTunes App Store (for iPod/iPhone/iPad), from the Google Play Store (for Androids), or from Blackberry World (for Blackberry).

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See the calendar of future Virtual Meetings sessions at www.genealogicalstudies.com; in the top menu choose INFORMATION and then VIRTUAL LEARNING ROOM in the drop-down menu.

If you have not attended a Virtual Meeting before, read the Instructions available at www.genealogicalstudies.com/instructions.pdf. If this URL does not open, please go to www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Virtual Learning Room in the drop down menu. The link to the Instructions (in PDF format) will be at the top right of the page (you may need to scroll over to the right side of the page).

Student Presentation: Telling your Ancestor’s Story Using US Civil War Records

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies course, Lecturing Skills Including Preparation, teaches the skills needed to present genealogical-related lectures. It is a “hands on” course where the student presents a lecture via our Virtual Learning Room. We invite you to participate and hear your fellow student. This is a 30-minute lecture, followed by a 10-minute Question & Answer period and a short poll to provide the student with feedback on their skills. Please come and support your fellow student!

This is an excellent learning experience for all involved–the student presenter and the audience! We all can learn new and interesting tidbits, even from topics that are not in our area of research.

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Join us on Friday, June 8th at 5:00 PM EDT when Albert Baines presents “Telling your Ancestor’s Story Using US Civil War Records.”

 

Albert Baines. Used with permission.

Presenter: Albert Baines, PLCGS has focused on the need to understand American and English records and history. He shares what he has learned to prevent others making the same mistakes.

Presentation Description: Civil War Military records can bring your ancestor to life by providing not only information concerning their military service but also details of their lives before and after the war.

Time zones:
Friday, June 8th – 5:00 PM Eastern; 4:00 PM Central; 2:00 PM Pacific; 10:00 PM in London, England;
Saturday, June 9th – 7:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/lecturing/
(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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We would like to thank Kathy Holland for hosting this student presentation.

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Remember, to join a Virtual Meeting … anyone can participate. Hope to see you there!

To enter the Virtual Learning Room for a session you would like to attend, please click on the Location link or enter the Location URL into your browser. (No user name or password required; “Enter as a Guest”)

NOTE: Please sign in with your first AND last names when joining a Virtual Meeting. This will help everyone differentiate between individuals with the same name. (No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

Join Us For Graduation 2018!

Doctorate Hat With Degree by digitalart/Courtesy Freedigitalphotos.net

Join us for our 2018 graduation ceremony on Friday June 1st as we honor GRADUATES of the Certificate in Genealogical Studies program. This year, it will be in Guelph, Ontario at the start of the Ontario Genealogical Society’s annual conference between 4:30 and 5:30 PM (Eastern Daylight Time).

Our students and graduates are from all around the world. Naturally, because of the distances, many graduates have difficulty attending their ceremony. For a few years now we have used the Virtual Meeting Room so everyone can attend. For those who cannot attend locally we hope to see you virtually.

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies invites you to come celebrate with us, with our students, our graduates, and our instructors. Graduates invite your family. Everyone is welcome!

June 1st, 2016 at 4:30 PM EDT
(3:30 PM Central; 1:30 PM Pacific; 9:30 PM in London and on June 2nd at 6:30 AM in Sydney).

GRADUATION LOCATION:
For those attending the Ontario Genealogical Society Conference, check at the OGS registration desk for the room location.

University of Guelph
At intersection Highway 6, Highway 7 and Wellington County Road 124
Guelph, Ontario

GRADUATION VIRTUAL LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/graduation/
(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

Hope to see you in-person or online on Friday, June 1st!

Keeping In Touch With The National Institute For Genealogical Studies

Red Telephone Box by Tom Curtis/Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Red Telephone Box by Tom Curtis/Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In the genealogy world we need to communicate with each other to keep abreast of the constantly evolving research methods and resources. The same is true within The National Institute for Genealogical Studies. As a student of the National Institute, there are various ways you can communicate with us and your fellow students. Here is how:

#1 By email to the National Institute

When contacting us please include your first and last name and the course title, including the country the course applies to.

i) admin@genealogicalstudies.com – for general questions;

ii) alert@genealogicalstudies.com – to advise us of broken links in your course materials and assignments–please be specific as to where problem is;

iii) exam@genealogicalstudies.com – questions pertaining to your course exam.

#2 By email to a fellow student

When you view a fellow student’s public assignment SUBMISSION/ANSWER and you would like to contact them about something in their posting, simply click on the envelope icon to the right of the student’s name. A new window will open where you can type your message. For privacy reasons, you will not see the recipient’s email address and they have the option to reply or not.

#3 Attend a Virtual Meeting

VIRTUAL MEETINGS ARE THE BEST PLACE TO COMMUNICATE with an instructor and fellow students. Anyone can participate! You do not have to be registered in the course to attend. When attending virtual meetings, please bring questions applicable to the topic being discussed.

Watch for our emails outlining upcoming virtual meetings dates and times. Or visit our website at www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Virtual Learning Room for the full schedule.

#4 Follow the National Institute’s Blog

Go to http://blog.genealogicalstudies.com/ and scroll down. On the right hand side of the page you will see Subscribe to Blog via Email. In the text box, enter your email address and click on the Subscribe button. Once subscribed, you will receive an email each time we post an article. Each blog article includes a link to write a comment or share via social media. Look for these options at the end of each blog post.

#5 Follow us on Twitter

Once signed into your Twitter account, search for us on Twitter by our Twitter name @GeneaStudies. On our Twitter page, click on the Follow button to subscribe to our tweets. Not a member of Twitter? No problem, just go to Twitter www.twitter.com and join. Membership is free.

#6 Follow The National Institute on Facebook

To follow us on Facebook you must be a member. To join Facebook go to www.facebook.com and sign up. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/National-Institute-for-Genealogical-Studies/110290648619 and click on the Like button on the top right of our page.

#7 Join a GenealogyWise group to communicate with your fellow students

Go to www.genealogywise.com and Sign Up. There are groups set up for each of the National Institute’s country streams; i.e. American, Australian, Canadian, English, German, Irish, and Scottish, as well as Methodology, Librarianship, Alumni, and First Timer FAQs.

#8 Follow GenealogyWise on Facebook

To follow us on Facebook you must be a member. To join Facebook go to www.facebook.com and sign up. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GenealogyWise and click on the Like button on the top right of our page.

#9 Consultation with an instructor ($)

If you want to have a one-on-one consultation with an instructor this can be arranged. Please email admin@genealogicalstudies.com to request an appointment. When emailing please provide some information as to what course and some background details you would like to discuss so we can recommend a consultation with an appropriate instructor. The consultation with an instructor is available for a modest fee.

May 2018 Virtual Meetings

May Month Art Grunge Design by fotographic1980/Courtesy Freedigitalphotos.net

Welcome to the May Virtual Meetings! Mark your calendars! Times given are Eastern Daylight Time.

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Tuesday, May 15th at 8:00 PM EDT – All DNA courses with Shannon Combs-Bennett   

This session is appropriate for students registered in/working on the DNA stream, Forensic Genealogy, Genetics & Medical Family History, Organising a One-Name Study, and Organising a One-Place Study courses, although all are welcome. The focus of this Virtual Meeting is the DNA testing process and how DNA can be use in genealogy research. Join Shannon to ask questions about these courses and/or your DNA research.

Time zones:

Tuesday, May 15th – 8:00 PM Eastern; 7:00 PM Central; 5:00 PM Pacific;

Wednesday, May 16th – 1:00 AM in London, England; 10:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/dna/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Wednesday, May 16th at 3:00 PM EDT – All Scottish courses with Sheena Tait 

Join Sheena to ask questions about the Scottish  record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Wednesday, May 16th – 3:00 PM Eastern; 2:00 PM Central; Noon Pacific; 8:00 PM in London, England;

Thursday, May 17th – 5:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/scottish/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Wednesday, May 16th at 8:00 PM EDT – All Canadian courses with Kathryn Lake Hogan    

Join Kathryn to ask questions about the Canadian record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Wednesday, May 16th – 8:00 PM Eastern; 7:00 PM Central; 5:00 PM Pacific;

Thursday, May 17th – 1:00 AM in London, England; 10:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/canadian/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Wednesday, May 23th at 7:00 PM EDT – Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program-Part 3 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega      

This Virtual Meeting is more appropriate for students registered in this course. Please follow the directions found in your course material and read the article “Identification through Signatures: Using Complex Direct Evidence to Sort Colwills of Cornwall” by Ronald A. Hill (NGSQ Vol. 87, No. 3, September, 1999).

Time zones:

Wednesday, May 23th – 7:00 PM Eastern; 6:00 PM Central; 4:00 PM Pacific;

Thursday, May 24th – Midnight in London, England; 9:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle3/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Wednesday, May 23th at 8:30 PM EDT – All American courses with Gena Philibert-Ortega      

Join Gena to ask questions about the American record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Wednesday, May 23th – 8:30 PM Eastern; 7:30 PM Central; 5:30 PM Pacific;

Thursday, May 24th – 1:30 PM in London, England; 10:30 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/american/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Saturday, May 26th at 10:00 AM EDT – Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program-Part 1 – ARTICLE REVIEW with Gena Philibert-Ortega    

This Virtual Meeting is more appropriate for students registered in this course. Please follow the directions found in your course material and read the article “Heritage Books and Family Lore: A Jackson Test in Missouri and Idaho” by Connie Lenzen (NGSQ Vol. 86, No. 1, March, 1998).

Time zones:

Saturday, May 26th – 10:00 AM Eastern; 9:00 AM Central; 7:00 AM Pacific; 3:00 PM in London, England;

Sunday, May 27th – Midnight in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/asarticle1/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Tuesday, May 29th at 5:00 PM EDT – All English courses with Brenda Wheeler    

Join Brenda to ask questions about the English record courses and/or your research.

Time zones:

Tuesday, May 29th – 5:00 PM Eastern; 4:00 PM Central; 2:00 PM Pacific; 10:00 PM in London, England;

Wednesday, May 30th – 7:00 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/english/     

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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Tuesday, May 29th at 6:30 PM EDT – All Methodology courses with Brenda Wheeler     

This Virtual Meeting is appropriate for ALL students no matter which country you are researching in. Join this session to ask questions or to discuss organizing, skill-building, strategies, effective searching and recording, proving it, transcribing, abstracting, extracting, copyright, and much more.

Note: This Virtual Meeting is available for the convenience of our Australasia students; however, everyone is welcome to participate! It is applicable to all students no matter what country you are researching in.

Time zones:

Tuesday, May 29th – 6:30 PM Eastern; 5:30 PM Central; 3:30 PM Pacific; 11:30 PM in London, England;

Wednesday, May 30th – 8:30 AM in Sydney, Australia

MEETING LOCATION: http://genealogicalstudies.adobeconnect.com/methodology/

(NOTE: No user name or password required. Please type in your first and last name; then click “Enter as a Guest”.)

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LISTEN ON THE GO!

Want to listen to the student presentation but will not be at your computer? No problem! You can download the FREE Adobe Connect Mobile App from the iTunes App Store (for iPod/iPhone/iPad), from the Google Play Store (for Androids), or from Blackberry World (for Blackberry).

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See the calendar of future Virtual Meetings sessions at www.genealogicalstudies.com; in the top menu choose INFORMATION and then VIRTUAL LEARNING ROOM in the drop-down menu.

If you have not attended a Virtual Meeting before, read the Instructions available at www.genealogicalstudies.com/instructions.pdf. If this URL does not open, please go to www.genealogicalstudies.com, click on Information in the top menu bar, and then Virtual Learning Room in the drop down menu. The link to the Instructions (in PDF format) will be at the top right of the page (you may need to scroll over to the right side of the page).

 

7 Reasons to Register for Research: House and Farm Histories

Bush House, Grove Hill, Clarke County, Alabama By Altairisfar – Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5290438

By Sandy Fackler, PLCGS (student)

Have you noticed that the covers of genealogy magazines use teasers to get you to look inside them?  Titles like “Three tips to tear down your brick wall” or “Four ways to become a better genealogist.” Not to be outdone, I’m offering seven reasons for you to take Research: House and Family Histories.

Reason 1. You’ll learn architectural styles. Do you know which style has a mansard roof? Can you tell the difference between French Colonial, Southern Colonial, New England Colonial, Spanish Colonial, and Dutch Colonial? These and others are detailed in this course.

Reason 2. You’ll learn about the companies who sold mail order homes. We’ve all heard about Sears homes, but did you know other companies sold them as well? Do you know which American company sold mail order homes in Australia, England, and other countries?

Reason 3. You’ll learn which farm buildings were sold by mail and the companies that manufactured them. Do you know there are different styles of barns?

Reason 4. You’ll learn the definition of farmer was not static. How many times do you think the definition has changed between 1850 and 1974? For what purpose was it changed?

Reason 5. You’ll learn that a farm could be included in another census schedule besides agricultural. Do you know which one?  What information does an agricultural census contain?

Reason 6. You’ll learn the sources you’ll need to research and the information they contain to do a house or farm history. Do you know what an abstract of title is or how it can help in your research? Do you know what a mechanic’s lien is or if you need to check for one when you do a house history?

Reason 7. You’ll learn about centennial farms and the requirements to become one. Do they have centennial farms in your state? If you live on a farm does your farm qualify?

Whether you want to research your own house or farm, do house and farm histories for clients, or write newspaper articles about your town’s homes, Research: House and Farm Histories can add to your education and for professional genealogists, can provide the basis for another income-producing stream for your business.

Research: House and Farm Histories is a six-module intermediate level course and is required if you’re pursuing a Professional Development Certificate  from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies.  The next course begins June 4, 2018.

 

 

Sandy Fackler, PLCGS, holds certificates in American Records, Irish Records, and Methodology from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Her favorite source is old newspapers and she spends her free time reading and transcribing them. She is currently researching her third great uncle (a sideshow performer) and several local history stories.

 

 

A Few of our Favorite Websites

Keyboard And Mouse With Coffee by Stuart Miles/Courtesy Freedigitalphotos.net

During the Internet Tools Virtual Meeting last week, instructor Gena Philibert-Ortega posed the question, “what are your  5 favorite genealogy websites?” The only rule was that you couldn’t name a subscription website.

What came out of that meeting was a great list of  websites.

Couldn’t make the virtual meeting? No problem. See the list below and consider creating your own list from these links.

Internet Archive
British Columbia Archives
Library and Archives Canada

FamilySearch – Family History Research Wiki

Saskatchewan Genealogical Society – Changes of Names
Provincial Archives of Saskatchewan – Hometead Index
Linkpendium

DeadFred

Peel’s Prairie Provinces
Society for Eastern European Genealogy

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics 

Seeking Michigan 
US Bureau of Land Management – General Land Office
US Census Bureau – History

US Census Bureau – History – State Censuses 
Olive Tree Genealogy

United States Maps
Library and Archives Canada – Electoral Atlas of the Dominion of Canada(1895)

Global Genealogy –Ontario, Upper Canada, Canada West Genealogy & History Resources 

One-Step Webpages by Steve Morse

Old Fulton Post Cards  (newspapers)

US GenWeb

Canadian County Atlas Digital Project – 1880 Map of Ontario Counties

RootsPoint – Family Histories 

Mennonite Church USA Archives – MennObits

County & Town Histories

Automated Genealogy 

British Newspaper Archives

United Empire Loyalists’ Association of Canada

Microcolour Map Display System (scroll down for map catalogue)

Ask About Ireland – Griffith’s Valuation 

Deceased Online

All Census Records – Questions Asked on the 1861 Agricultural Census

LibGuides –  U.S. & Canada *: Primary Sources by Century

LibGuides

Death Indexes 

 

The Ancestor Hunt

Ancient Faces 

Cyndi’s List

GenWed

Incorporating Social History Into Family History

Soldiers in formation on the grounds of Camp Sherman. NPS Photo. https://www.nps.gov/articles/camp-sherman-ohio.htm

Soldiers in formation on the grounds of Camp Sherman. NPS Photo. https://www.nps.gov/articles/camp-sherman-ohio.htm

 

By Sandy Fackler, PLCGS (student)

When I first started doing genealogy I collected names, dates, and places. I was a genealogist. Years later I became a family historian. Besides those names, dates and places, I wanted to know the what, when, where, and how. I needed the meat on the bones.

The transition was not a deliberate course of action. I think it started because of my paternal grandfather. He died three years before I was born. My father was raised by his maternal grandparents and he couldn’t tell me much about him. I set out to find more about my grandfather.

One of the first things I learned about him was that he was in World War I. He didn’t see active duty but he graduated from the Cooks and Bakers School at a nearby training camp. That led to information on his training at the camp.

The search was on.

I read every newspaper in the town nearest the camp from February 1917 through the end of the camp’s life plus the camp’s newspapers. I read every publication on the camp both government issued and commercial, as well as journal and magazine articles. I bought photos, negatives, letters, postcards, training materials, and maps of the camp. I even sought out  artifacts, such as teaspoons and salt & pepper souvenirs. I know all the churches and YMCAs, the locations of barracks, buildings and streets, and their names. I know about the sports and training activities. Even today, 40+ years after starting that research, I still search for information.

One of several YMCAs on the grounds of Camp Sherman. NPS Photo. https://www.nps.gov/hocu/learn/historyculture/camp-sherman.htm

One of several YMCAs on the grounds of Camp Sherman. NPS Photo. https://www.nps.gov/hocu/learn/historyculture/camp-sherman.htm

By doing the research on the camp, I can put together a day-by-day account of what life may have been like for my grandfather for the 141 days he was there.

What does this have to do with Social History?  Social History is defined as “the environmental history of an individual.”[i]

The National Institute for Genealogical Studies course, Research: Social History written by Barbara J. Starmanstakes you through every aspect of an individual’s life and provides the resources to do so. Each module has a case study to inspire you. Check out the topics covered by skimming the table of contents here on The National Institute’s website.

Research: Social History is offered once a quarter and the next start date is  May 7, 2018. If you have a favorite relative you want to know more about, I recommend Research: Social History. I believe if you take this course and use the resources and techniques or the case studies as examples, you can learn how to put the meat on the bones of your ancestors.  You’ll enjoy doing social history and it will be one of your favorite courses.

 

___________________________

[i] Merriam-Webster Dictionary. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/social%20history  Accessed April 2, 2018

 

Sandy Fackler, PLCGS, holds Certificates in American Records, Irish Records, and Methodology from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. Her favorite source is old newspapers and spends her free time reading and transcribing them. She is currently researching her third great uncle (a sideshow performer) and several local history stories.

 

 

 

 

 

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